Tag Archive: Third From the Right Productions


It’s amazing to think that Soho Cinders is only the third outing for Third from the Right Productions. And it’s been a privilege to experience all the shows from this talented lot. And how they’ve grown. From a cast of six in Shout, to eight in Disenchanted, and now a full company with a massive 24.

Loosely based on the fairytale of Cinderella, Soho Cinders sees us in modern day London with our own Cinders (Robbie) trying to juggle his love life between the possessive Lord Bellingham and London Mayoral candidate, James Prince. Other elements from Cinderella include the ugly sisters in Clodagh and Dana (Two 1970s Eurovision names, perhaps?) and Robbie’s best friend, Velcro, who is unrequitedly in love with him. Of course. Velcro/Buttons. Took me a minute to get that one. Simple but clever.

In Styles and Drew, Soho Cinders have songwriters of the highest calibre, having been previously given the job by Cameron Mackintosh to add new songs to enhance the classic Mary Poppins for the stage, plus, the recent revival of Half a Sixpence.

Playing Robbie was Joshua Hawkins who gave a good performance, excelling in the number, They Don’t Make Glass Slippers. Opposite, him, Prince Charming was Adam Siviter who combined well with Hawkins on Gypsies of the Ether.

The last time I saw Kerry Davies and Sarah Coussens with Third From the Right, they played a clinically insane Belle and an out-of-rehab mermaid in Disenchanted, Now with more serious roles, they worked brilliantly together as Velcro and Marilyn in one of the numbers of the night – Let Him Go. Another performance of note was Carl Cook as the shady William, especially with The Tail That Wags the Dog. And I can’t mention character performances without heaping loads of praise on Gillian Homer and Natalie Baggott as Dana and Clodagh, especially during their rendition of Fifteen Minutes.

Supporting well on the night, we had Tony Newbold (Lord Bellingham), Amy Pearson (Sidesaddle), Kaz Luckins (Sasha) and Jake Winwood (Customer and Goldfish Man). Finally, adding narrative to proceedings was Matt Dudley.

As I have said already, Soho Cinders was a step-up with the introduction of chorus, and these new members worked well with energy and enthusiasm. It must be difficult for a relatively new company to build up camaraderie and a family atmosphere, but Third from the Right pulled it off.

Other top numbers of the night for me included: Old Compton Street, You Shall Go to the Ball and Who’s That Boy?

At the helm in production and having done a great job was Gaynor Whitehouse with direction and choreography, assisted by Jez Luckins and Dave Gardner. And in charge of an effective five-piece band, with high standards as ever, was Chris Corcoran.

The only criticism I would have of the show has nothing to do with production or cast, it is that the script felt a bit sluggish as times with not enough laughs. This I’d put down to the writers combining their obvious songwriting talents with delivering the book. You really do have to be top drawer in all departments to achieve this. Also, some of the lines could have made Robbie and James more likable. As it was, I had little empathy for them and more so those they left behind.

Still, we had a good show complete with a vibrant ending. A new dawn for a wonderful company. Long may they continue.

Cheers.

Antony N Britt

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Two years ago, Third From The Right Productions introduced me to a brilliant show I’d not heard of: Shout! And now they’ve gone and done it again with the excellent Disenchanted. This Off-Broadway musical is the brainchild of Dennis T. Giacino who wrote the book, music and lyrics.

Disenchanted tells about several fairy tale princesses whose stories have been corrupted by that most evil of beings – Disney. These are characters gone wrong, and in spectacular fashion. Very off-the-wall and tongue-in-cheek.

Bemoaning the fact they often seem to be vulnerable and in need of rescuing by a handsome prince, our princesses put the record straight. Life is not all happy endings with reality very different. It’s a sentiment I totally approve of, as will be seen by anybody attending my own self-penned pantomime in November; ironically, Sleeping Beauty, from AMCS.

Leading the disenchanted we had a fearsome Snow White (Natalie Baggot), a dreamy Sleeping Beauty (Gaynor Whitehouse) and a fluffy-headed Cinderella (Jo Foley). Foley’s performance reminded me, in looks as well as character, of Emma Chambers’ Alice in The Vicar of Dibley. Combining well for Once More Happily Ever After and A Happy Tune, the three were present throughout much of the performance, supporting, complimenting and downright bickering.

Also present were Gillian Homer (Pocahontas), Amy Pearson (Mulan – who may or may not be a lesbian) and Kaz Luckins (Rapunzel & The Princess Who Kissed A Frog). Then we had the out of rehab, Little Mermaid (Sarah Coussens) and Princess Badroulbadour (Kerry Davies). The latter also played my favourite character in the show, the clinically insane Belle, singing (of course) Insane.

Each of the cast contributed to great all-round entertainment. A breath of fresh air which the only shame is afterwards, I can’t find evidence of a CD Soundtrack anywhere. Damn! I want to relive the moment.

Other top numbers for me were: Honestly, Big Tits and All I Wanna Do is Eat. Then there was Not Von Red Cent, involving audience participation in the form of a sing-off between the front row right and … the rest of the audience. Guess where I was sitting? I don’t think we did too bad, though.

Disenchanted was directed by Jez Luckins with choreography and supporting direction from Gaynor Whitehouse. The musical director was Chris Corcoran.

Second time for me experiencing Third From The Right Productions and the first for Disenchanted. I’d recommend both whenever you get the chance. Word of warning, though. Sit on the front row at your peril.

Disenchanted – The Blue Orange Theatre, Birmingham – 31 August 2018

Cheers.

Antony N Britt

I was privileged the other week to be a witness to Shout – The Mod Musical. Shout was the debut show from Third From The Right Productions, and a successful production it was at that. Well, in terms of audience enjoyment.

Shout – Rowley Learning Campus – July 30 2016

Shout tells the story of the 1960s through lives of five women, all of whom have their ongoing struggles. Throughout the show, the five send letters to Gwendoline Holmes, an advice columnist for Shout Magazine who responds in consistent fashion … with useless advice. For instance, recommending new a hairstyle or manicure as remedies for domestic abuse.

Shout was a novel show which had me tapping the beat all the way to the standing (dancing) ovation at the end. Musical highlights were: To Sir With Love, One Two Three, Those Were the Days, Don’t Sleep in the Subway, These Boots are Made for Walkin’ and one of my favourite Sixties songs, Downtown. Interspersed between these were sometimes poignant, but often, funny vignettes and monologues. These ranged from discovering sexuality, dealing with a wife-beater, learning the side effects of the pill, and one girl’s most embarrassing moment in forgetting a word to a song while performing on stage. “Down – Town! It’s the name of the bloody song!

Third From The Right are a new company who aim to bring quality, but lesser known musical theatre to a wider audience, appealing to all ages.

Performing were: Amy Pearson (Red Girl), Natalie Baggott (Blue Girl), Jo Foley (Orange Girl), Kaz Luckins (Green Girl) and Gaynor Whitehouse (Yellow Girl). Gaynor was also responsible for choreography. Completing the all female cast was Jeni Hatton as Gwendoline Holmes.

Directing Shout was Jez Luckins with musical direction from Chris Corcoran.

So with a statement of wanting to bring the lesser known musicals into a wider domain, did Shout do it for me? Well, I’d certainly go and see it again. Well done, Third From The Right.

Third From The Right Productions

Cheers.

Nick

 

 

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