Tag Archive: Theatre


I love youth theatre. I’ve seen a fair bit in the past couple of years and however much I enjoy professional and amateur productions, youth theatre is where it begins.

I’d not heard of Back to the 80s before but being (Ahem!) a certain age, the tunes were familiar to me. I’d also not had any experience so far of Birmingham Youth Theatre but on the night, was not disappointed.

Back to the 80s – Old Rep Theatre, Birmingham – 9 June 2018

Back to the 80s is a coming of age, feelgood romp set in the senior year of William Ocean High School (nice pun) and told retrospectively through the narrative of Corey Palmer Senior (Callum Byrne). Characters are split into the familiar which you would relate to from any school experience. We had the regular kids, the cool guys (Were they ever really cool in our school days?), the popular girls, the outcasts and the teachers. With a decent script from Neil Gooding, the show is brought to life immediately with Kids in America. Okay, I was sold, and suddenly seventeen again.

And the numbers kept coming: Girls Just Want to Have Fun, Let’s Hear it for the Boy, Footloose, I’m Gonna Be (500 Miles), Total Eclipse of the Heart, Material Girl, Get Outta My Dreams (Get into My Car) and The Final Countdown. These were just a selection which made Back to the 80s such a blast. Ending the night, we had I’ve Had the Time of My Life, a song which has never been a favourite of mine, but one perfect to finish on. Also, strangely, another song which I openly dislike, ended being my top tune in We Are the World.

Founded in 1987, Birmingham Youth Theatre stage two shows a year, featuring talent up to 19 years of age. And talent was very much on view. What impressed me most was that nobody was left out. Everyone appeared to have dialogue and more importantly, solo lines during the songs. All delivered in great style.

Playing the lead role of Callum Junior was Dylan Mulholland who turned in a fine performance. Equally so were Sam Cox (Mr Cocker), Georgia Taylor (Miss Brannigan), Cameron Simpson (Billy), Zak Hayes (Michael), Anna Simpson (Cyndi), Harry Chamberlain (Fergal) and Maddison Clarke (Tiffany). However, those were the principles. I never normally stretch as far as naming an entire cast, but the whole of BYT deserve it, so I will. This includes: Sydney Pope (Mel), Wiktoria Matysiak (Kim), Molly Ewins (Laura), Abbie Hudson (Debbie), Kishan Sambhi (Alf), Daniel Bromley (Kirk) and Holly-Mae Nelson (Eileen). In the chorus, we had Saran Sambhi, Abigail Guest, Abi Shiriane and Karina Galloway. Lastly, a special mention to the lad who appeared to be the youngest member; Dylan-Jak O’Dwyer who portrayed several comic mini characters including Yoda, Mr Miagi and Mario.

In charge of production we had Adam Swift (Director), Chris Corcoran (Musical Director) and Sam Depper (Choreography).

After the curtains closed I was, as often, the solitary sole applauding the band’s play-out music (Everyone always forgets the band). And I could hear from the stage the cries of “We are BYT! We are BYT!” Something to be proud of, indeed.


Back to the 80s – Old Rep Theatre, Birmingham – 9 June 2018

Cheers.

Antony N Britt.

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A month ago I saw Legally Blonde at The Crescent Theatre, performed by the brilliant Bournville Musical Theatre Company. As I enjoyed that so much, I thought I’d take the opportunity of seeing the touring production at the New Alexander Theatre.

Legally Blonde – The New Alexander Theatre, Birmingham – 23 May 2018

Unlike last month, the opening was low-key, and the show took time to build the energy, perhaps needing some of that Red Bull Elle drinks in the show. I guess some of the atmosphere came from the fact this was a matinee with the auditorium barely a third full, which was a pity as it was a great show.

Legally Blonde is fast climbing the list of my top shows and this performance did nothing to harm that. In the role of Elle we had Rebecca Stenhouse, standing in due to the illness of Lucie Jones. Well, I never watch X-Factor or Eurovision, so had no knowledge of Lucie, and could therefore appreciate the characterisation with an open mind. And what a good portrayal she gave. Suited the role perfectly, giving a faultless showing with strong voice and acting.

Playing Paulette, the top billing went to former EastEnders actress. Rita Simons, who captured the role well, making Ireland one of the best numbers. I did think Paulette’s outfits weren’t oddball enough, but this did not detract from Rita’s performance. Also from the world of soaps we had Bill Ward, last seen plunging from a bridge in Emmerdale. He made the perfect Callaghan.

I have said the atmosphere grew throughout and the culmination of this was an energetic finale, complete with pink ticker-tape, much of which I found on me hours later. Best number of the day for me was Legally Blonde itself. However, Gay or European did not live up to my previous experiences. A slight downside also was that dialogue seemed a little rushed on occasions. Still, a show full of memorable numbers: Bend and Snap, What You Want, Positive, So Much Better and Take it Like a Man were all highlights of an enjoyable afternoon.

Also appearing were David Barrett (Emmett), Liam Doyle (Warner), Laura Harrison (Vivienne), Helen Petrova (Whitney/Brooke Wyndham), Ben Harlow (Kyle), Mark Peachey (Winthrop/Dewey), Alexandra Wright (Margot), Rachel Grundy (Serena), Delycia Belgrave (Pilar), Nancy Hill (Enid Hoops), Rosie Needham (Kate/Chutney), Michael Hamway (Aaron Shultz), Felipe Bejarano (Sundeep/Nikos), Lucyelle Cliffe (Judge/Pforzheiner/Store Manager), Sally Frith (Gaelen), Brett Shields (Grand Master Chad), Craig Tyler (Carlos) and Laura Mullowney (Swing).

Legally Blonde was directed and choreographed by Anthony Williams with co-choreography from Dean Street. The musical director was James McCullagh.

The second production of Legally Blonde I have experienced within a few weeks, and I would see a third if the chance came. A great show that I’d highly recommend if it comes your way.

Legally Blonde – The New Alexander Theatre, Birmingham – 23 May 2018

Cheers.

Antony N Britt

I’ll admit straight off, I’m not a Take That fan. Okay, I don’t dislike them. They seem nice guys and the music isn’t offensive. However, they wouldn’t be on my playlist and I could just about name five songs.

The Band – Birmingham Hippodrome 7 May 2018

The Band focuses on a group of 16-year-old girls who steal away in the night to see the famous, but unnamed band in the show. A series of soul-searching moments ends with them vowing to never lose touch. Of course, things never work out that way and an incident I won’t reveal a spoiler of, causes them to go their separate ways. Only 25 years later do they reunite, coinciding with the boybands reunion in Prague.

Now, both Queen and Abba have sounds which transformed brilliantly to the stage, therefore, would the biggest boyband of the 90s do likewise? Only partly, in my opinion.

Don’t get me wrong. I enjoyed the show. Tim Firth’s script is well-written and funny. Add to that, all the characters were brought to life in brilliant fashion by a superb cast.

And then the band began to sing, which is where the show falls flat. The lads in the band were chosen from TV talent show, Let it Shine and cloned from every generic boyband of the last quarter of a century. Decent enough singers, but nothing special and they were given too much exposure which took attention from the main characters in the show. They needed to be further in the background and I found myself switching off every time they took centre stage. The Band weren’t the stars, more of a Greek Chorus and should have been used so. If you want to see a boyband perform, go see a boyband. I watch an awful lot of musical theatre and unfortunately, many songs didn’t transform well to stage. In fact, the only ones which did wow me were those sung by the women (in both young and older incarnations).

The Band wasn’t about the pop band, rather the band of friendship between our main characters. Favourite of these for me was the introverted Zoe (Played by Jayne McKenna {grown up} and Lauren Jacobs {younger}) who came to life once when out of the comfort zone. I can relate to that. I also had a soft spot for Every Dave, a man portrayed superbly by Andy Williams who turned up in many situations with no pretence at all to be a different person.

In addition to Zoe and Every Dave, Rachel was played by Rachel Lumberg and Faye Christall. Claire – Alison Fitzjohn and Sarah Kate Howarth. Heather – Claudia Bradley and Katy Clayton. Debbie – Rachelle Diedricks. And finally, Jeff – Martin Miller.

Top numbers for me were: Rule the World, Shine, Greatest Day and Relight my Fire. But by far the best was the poignant Back for Good. Beautiful from start to finish.

The Band on the night were: A J Bently, Nick Carsberg, Yazdan Qafouri, Sario Solomon and Harry Brown. The show was directed by Kim Gavin and Jack Ryder.

At the end, we had a rousing finale in which most of the audience rose to join in, including me. And why not. It’s a great feat to perform and the cast deserved their moment.

The Band – Birmingham Hippodrome 7 May 2018

Cheers.

Antony N Britt

A new one for me and yet again, a show I’ve not seen a film version of. However, I hadn’t gone unprepared and bought the CD a couple of weeks earlier, and so good is the soundtrack, I knew I was in for a treat. Equally so with the case of it being staged by the wonderful Bournville Musical Theatre Company (BMTC) whose 2017 Pajama Game was one of my theatre highlights of the year. You know what you’re getting with BMTC so add a show which is impossible not to enjoy and you have the recipe for a great night out.

Legally Blonde – The Crescent Theatre, Birmingham – 26 April 2018 Bournville Musical Theatre Company BMTC

Legally Blonde tells the story of ditzy Elle Woods who goes to law school in search of love, and her ex-boyfriend, Warner Huntington III. However, things rarely go to plan and Elle shows we can find our way without having to change who we are.

A great show full of energy from the opening Omigod You Guys and beyond. It’s a great testament to Legally Blonde and the cast and crew of BMTC that I never checked the clock once and that time literally flew. Stunning acting, fabulous dance and great voices.

Other number to love include … well, there are so many. I particularly liked Ireland, What You Want, Whipped into Shape, Bend and Snap, Legally Blonde and Find My Way. Heck, I even loved the bows. However, my outright favourite (and best scene of the show) was There! Right There! (Gay or European?). It’s so wrong, it’s brilliant. Had me rolling all though the number.

Playing our Legally Blonde Elle we had Chloe Turner who was made for this role. Great voice, great moves and a wonderful presence that owned the stage. No mean feat when you consider the fantastic support. Can’t name everyone but I’m going to try a lot. It’s not often you come across a situation where every part seems to have been perfectly cast, but is was here. David Page as Emmett, Peter Holmes (Warner) and Phil Snowe (Callahan) were everything I’d imagined from my two weeks listening to the CD. Also giving fine performances were Lily Moore (Vivienne), Karen Lane (Enid Hoops), Claire Brough (Brooke Wyndham) and Adam Heeley (Kyle). Loved the walk, Kyle. Providing sporadic appearances were the girls of Delta Nu (Sophie Woods, Natalie Buzzard and Siobban Ganley). They shone throughout as Elle’s conscience and inner thoughts, a surreal idea I approve of totally. And then the rest of the cast – I can’t find fault with any. So much fun, so much professionalism, so much enjoyment. Finally, I always have a favourite character and this time it was Paulette, the oddball underdog, portrayed magnificently by Rhian Heeley. Very believable. Great comic timing.

At the directorial helm was John Morrison who has delivered a real hit. Supporting on the production side was Sadie Turner (Choreography) and Chris Corcoran (Musical Direction).

Next year, BMTC are performing Oliver and I already have my tickets sorted. I would say go and see Legally Blonde at The Crescent as it’s on until Saturday. However, it’s sold out, and justifiably so. One thing I’m sure of, audiences for the three remaining performances are in for the ride of their lives.

Legally Blonde – The Crescent Theatre, Birmingham – 26 April 2018 Bournville Musical Theatre Company BMTC

Cheers.

Antony N Britt

The Jets are gonna have their day – tonight. The Sharks are gonna have their way – tonight.

But which gang will triumph? Well, you can find out when the wonderful Aldridge Musical Comedy Society (AMCS) return to The Prince of Wales Theatre, Cannock with the legendary musical, West Side Story.

West Side Story – Prince of Wales Theatre, Cannock – 16 to 19 May 2018 Aldridge Musical Comedy Society AMCS

Set in the Upper West Side of New York in the 1950s, the two warring gangs are thrown into turmoil when former Jet leader, Tony, falls in love with Maria, sister of Bernardo, leader of the Sharks. Inspired by Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, Arthur Laurents book brings an urban touch to the story. With music by Leonard Bernstein and lyrics from Stephen Sondheim, it’s no wonder West Side is as popular today as in 1957 when first on Broadway.

Instantly recognisable are the songs: Somewhere, Tonight, I Feel Pretty, America and Maria. Add to that spectacular dance routines and you have a show the audience will be talking about for a long time.

Now beyond their 50th year, AMCS are known for delivering quality and professional shows which go beyond the remit of amateur dramatics. At the directorial helm is Sarah Beckett, doubling up with her usual role of choreographer while as musical director, Mark Bayliss leads a 19-piece orchestra.

West Side Story – Prince of Wales Theatre, Cannock – 16 to 19 May 2018 Aldridge Musical Comedy Society AMCS

The show is going to be massive. Tickets are selling fast but you can still get some by calling the ticket secretary on 07984 465400 or the box office (01543 578762). Alternatively, tickets can be purchased via StageStubs at this link.

West Side Story is on 16 to 19 May (1930 start). Prices are £15/Adult, £12/Concession and £10/under 16s.

Tonight, tonight, won’t be just any night …

Don’t miss out.

Cheers.

Antony N Britt.

I love Me and My Girl, and I’ve had good experiences of youth theatre in the past. Therefore, when I saw the show was being performed by Brewood’s Lollipop Theatre Arts, I had no hesitation in giving them a try. Particularly so because my society, Aldridge Musical Comedy Society, are doing the show next year.

Me and My Girl – Prince of Wales Theatre, Cannock – 26 March 2018

Lollipop cater for kids 6 to 18, and the full range were on show on the first of two nights.

Me and My Girl tells the story of Bill Snibson, the long-lost heir to the Hareford fortune. However, when the family discover Bill is a cockney of no standing, sparks begin to fly.

The score is from Noel Gay and book originally by L. Arthur Rose and Douglas Furber (although it has been updated by Stephen Fry and Mike Ockrent). A funny and entertaining show filled with well-known songs throughout, there isn’t a dull moment.

First impressions of Lollipop … My God, they’re so young! Yes, I know it’s a youth company, but the opening chorus of A Weekend at Hareford was delivered with such a professional sound, you might have thought otherwise.

In the lead role was Tom Horton who totally captured the character of Bill Snibson with superb comic timing. Most impressive in a demanding role was Tom’s ability to carry on, ad-libbing on a couple of occasions when lines slipped the mind. The improvisation added to the enjoyment.

Also on the opening night we had a shining star for the future in Florie Miles. Playing Sally Smith, so good were Florie’s vocals, I did think it was an older actress to begin with. Then I saw the cast photo and realised her years and saw a maturity which went way beyond them. Once You Lose Your Heart was equal to the version on The London Cast Recording. Florie would be at home in an adult company.

Additionaly excellent were Abbey Laycock (Duchess of Dene), Alex Jeffrey’s (Sir John Tremayne), Katie Hayes (Lady Jaqueline), Emily Smith (Gerald), Jake Watkins (Parchester), Sam Green (Charles), Isaac Brant (Sir Jasper Tring), James Shaw (Lord Battersby) and Amy Horton (Lady Battersby). I must also acknowledge, on 27 March, Sally Smith was to be played by Millie Cooper.

Me and My Girl has so many great numbers: Thinking of No One But Me, The Family Solicitor, Me and My Girl, Leaning on a Lamp, to name but a few. And that’s before you get to The Lambeth Walk and The Sun Has Got His Hat On.

Direction was from Lucy-Ellen Parker and Grace Bradshaw with choreography by Helen Stone and Isobel Burgess. In charge of musical direction was Matthew Davis with lighting – Dan Bywater.

Watching a youth show, it’s always good to witness the next generation of musical theatre in the making, but more important, seeing the kids enjoy themselves. A thoroughly entertaining night from a company I would strongly recommend for future productions.

Me and My Girl – Prince of Wales Theatre, Cannock – 26 March 2018

Cheers.

Antony N Britt

Two years ago, I witnessed one of the best shows I’ve ever seen in The Witches of Eastwick. It came courtesy of Birmingham Ormiston Academy (BOA), therefore, browsing the What’s On pages, I had no hesitation in giving them a second run with Sister Act. Still, we had different Year 13s, and I wondered if it would it live up to expectations.Sister Act – The Old Rep Theatre, Birmingham – 24 March 2018 Birmingham Ormiston Academy. BOA

I have to say, I had never seen Sister Act and only knew one number (which isn’t in the show these days), so you can say I went in blind.

Sister Act tells the story of Dolores Van Cartier, on the run from her crime boss boyfriend. About to give evidence against him, Dolores is given sanctuary in a convent.

A blast of an opener in Take Me to Heaven had everything from great vocals to fabulous dance, all performed with skill and energy. Other numbers I enjoyed were Good to Be a Nun, I Could Be That Guy and Raise Your Voice before a powerful reprise of Take Me to Heaven. Act Two was equally blessed (sorry for the nun pun) with Sunday Morning Fever, Here Within These Walls, The Life I Never Led, Sister Act and a rousing finale in Spread the Love Around.

As for performances, I must pay a huge tribute to the wonderful Grace Mikhael in the lead role of Dolores. On the night, Grace gave everything I love in a character. Excellent throughout, fantastic voice and acting with attitude. Body language was superb, mannerisms perfect. She owned the stage.

Not alone, there was magnificent support from other principles, namely Beth Tyrrell (Mother Superior), Hana Copestake (Sister Mary Robert), Callum Maine (Monsignor O’Hara), Mariah Loizou (Sister Mary Lazarus), Tom Cowan (Curtis Jackson), Meg Aucott (Sister Mary Partick), Jack Christou (Eddie Souther), Frazer Howes (TJ), Nathan King (Joey), Harry Singh (Pablo) and Keith Barratt (Ernie).

Sister Act was produced and directed by Dan Branch with choreography from Lee Crowley and Musical direction, Daniel Summers.

Two years after my first experience of BOA, I was once again left breathless and am already looking out for future productions. This was better than many professional shows; my partner even commenting that it outshone a touring Sister Act some years back at the Birmingham Hippodrome.

There’s little more I can say but as a school/academy offering, I have no hesitation in giving Sister Act full marks.

Sister Act – The Old Rep Theatre, Birmingham – 24 March 2018 Birmingham Ormiston Academy. BOA

Cheers.

Antony N Britt

This was my second experience of Trinity Musical Theatre Company, having seen their offering of The Witches of Eastwick twelve months ago. So, would this year’s production also deliver satisfaction?

Return to the Forbidden Planet – Dormiston Mill Theatre – 4 November 2017

The first thing to note is the cast are already on stage as the audience enter the auditorium. A good effect which grabs your attention as soon as you hit the seats. An impressive set with costumes reminiscent of Sci-Fi films, one of which Forbidden Planet is famous. In particular, the clone-like appearance of the females which had me thinking of Gerry Anderson’s UFO series of the 1970s.

The show has a low-key opening with flight attendants giving a demonstration of safety precautions. Different, but amusing. Then we have countdown and blast off to the sound of Wipe Out. What caught me straight away was how full the stage was. This was much down to members of the Linzi G School of Dance. A great collaboration which not only sees additional energy and interaction on stage, it also gives pupils experience to add to the CV.

Any fan of rock and roll will love Forbidden Planet; the hits come one after another. Great Balls of Fire, Good Vibrations and Young Girl, to name a few. And a good way to end the show with a medley of tunes, culminating with the comic, Monster Mash.

This is a strange show for me because there is so much I don’t like to begin with. I’m not a fan of the clunky Shakespearian dialogue, neither do I like the cop-out reprise at the start of Act Two where you have a different conclusion to the previous scene, but that’s just the writer in me. The fact I have niggles with the original Bob Carlton script goes to show how good a job the cast and crew have done to get me still raving positive about what was before me.

On the night there were excellent performances from Mitch Bastable as Tempest, Beth Berwick-Lowe (Miranda) and Pat Lewis (Prospero). Also supporting well were Naomi-Leeanne Millard (Gloria), Steve Taylor (Ariel), Abigail James (Bosun) and Mark Moran (Cookie). Okay, Cookie was a trifle older than expected, but this was dealt with in a tongue-in-cheek way at the end of Teenager in Love.

All in all, a thoroughly enjoyable night out. The biggest compliment I can give, though is that on the way to the theatre, I had the London Cast Recording CD on in the car. Trinity’s performance was better. Production for the show was in the experienced hands of Andy Poulton with choreography by Lindsey Grant (of Linzi G fame) and musical direction from Dan Tomkinson.

Return to the Forbidden Planet – Dormiston Mill Theatre – 4 November 2017

Next year, Trinity turn their hands to The Wizard of Oz and on current evidence, it will be another great show.

Cheers.

Antony N Britt

This was the third time I’d seen Bournville Musical Theatre Company in action and like the previous two occasions, I was not disappointed. Hollywood on Broadway featured songs originally from films which had subsequently been turned into shows. And there was much to love. Having seen many of those on the set list, I already knew I’d be in for a good time. But not only ones I was familiar with. Last year, Bournville introduced me to School of Rock and I enjoyed it so much, I purchased the soundtrack and recently saw the West End production. This time, my Amazon account has seen both Heathers and Shrek added to the basket.

Hollywood on Broadway – Dovehouse Theatre, Solihull – 29 October 2017

A fun intro with video montage of both film and stage set the scene. And use of a three-piece band produced a great sound, making one believe  we had more musicians than there actually were.

Opening with three numbers from Footloose, namely the title song, Learning to be Silent and The Girl Gets Around, we were soon in full swing. And then there was an excellent performance by Rachel Fox with I Have Nothing from The Bodyguard. Highlight of Act One for me was Freak Flag from Shrek. So much energy, so much fun.

A year ago I was in Thoroughly Modern Millie and despite seeing it twice since, I never tire and enjoyed Forget About the Boy and solos from Peter Holmes (What do I Need with Love) and Sophie Wood (Gimme Gimme). Also, we had tunes from Little Mermaid including Fathoms Below (Male Chorus), Part of your World (Natalie Buzzard) and Poor Unfortunate Soul (Lily Moore). Another lovely song on the day was With You from Ghost, delivered well by Claire Brough.

Act One ended on a high with an ad for next year’s show, Legally Blonde. Featuring first, Adam and Rhian Heeley with Serious, we then had the energetic Bend and Snap. And then into Act Two with a chorus of 42nd Street.

I’ve mentioned already that I’m intrigued by Heathers and this is due to the song, Candy Store. Then to contrast the previous fast pace, we had the poignant Seventeen from Jonny Stoker and Lily Moore.

One the best bits for me in Act Two were three numbers from Witches of Eastwick, featuring much of the cast. I’ve seen Witches twice in the last couple of years and it was a pleasure to revisit.

What I enjoy most in theatre are character parts and two stand out performances showcased this. Chloe Turner with What’s Wrong with Me from Singin’ in the Rain and Karen Lane with He Vas My Boyfriend from Young Frankenstein.

The show then ended with a retro trip and medley from Saturday Night Fever, leaving the audience in no doubt, they’d been entertained. Apologies for not naming everybody, but it’s impossible to do so. However, I will pay tribute to the fact all played a great part.

Hollywood on Broadway was directed by Sadie Turner with musical direction from Chris Corcoran.

Hollywood on Broadway – Dovehouse Theatre, Solihull – 29 October 2017

Cheers.

Antony N Britt

Apart from recognising a couple of numbers, I knew little about this show prior to arrival at the Birmingham Hippodrome. I’d hurriedly purchased the Broadway Cast soundtrack but in two hearings, very little had sunk in. So, would seeing it live change that?

Crazy for You – Birmingham Hippodrome – 25 October 2017

 

Crazy for You tells the story of Bobby Child who is sent by his banking mother to foreclose a loan in the backwater town of Deadrock, Nevada. Based on the 1930 Ira/George Gershwin show, Girl Crazy, the story was reworked with a book by Ken Ludwig in 1992 and incorporates songs from several other Gershwin productions.

The first thing of note was the doubling up of band/cast with most instruments played on stage. It’s a method I’ve seen a lot recently and works well, although this time at the loss of huge dance routines. We had a decent opening which continued in an inoffensive manner throughout. Songs like Someone to Watch Over Me, Things are Looking Up and But Not For Me were well delivered but it’s the chorus numbers which make the show. I’ve Got Rhythm is no doubt the best known but equally, Stiff Upper Lip and The Real American Folk Song is a Rag were also enjoyable.

Taking the lead in Crazy for You was Tom Chambers as Bobby with Caroline Flack (Irene), Charlotte Wakefield (Polly) and Neil Ditt (Bela Zangler). My only real criticism would be that the supporting characters lacked depth, making them more forgettable, which is a shame for the actors who did a good job. The script was decent, if a little predictable, but there were several funny moments. My favourite had to be the drunk double scene which (I’m not sure if intentional or not) paid homage to the Marx Brothers mirror scene from Duck Soup.

The ending is a little low key but I still came out of the theatre with the feelgood factor. And next day, I listened to the CD for a third time and on this occasion, found myself reminiscing the show with more familiarity concerning the numbers. Therefore, for me, the show had done its job.

Crazy for You was directed by Paul Hart with musical supervision from Catherine Jayes and choreography, Nathan M Wright.

Crazy for You – Birmingham Hippodrome – 25 October 2017

Cheers.

Antony N Britt

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