Tag Archive: Bournville


The Wedding Singer was never a classic movie in 1998, and the stage musical isn’t a classic either, but if you want harmless feelgood fun, this is a show for you. For what Wedding Singer lacks in depth of plot and music, it gives in escapism and nostalgia. But you still need to make the best of what you have and fortunately, Bournville Musical Theatre Company did just that.

The Wedding Singer – The Crescent Theatre, Birmingham – 21 May 2022

The show tells the story of Robbie Hart, played superbly by Stuart McDiarmid, who gets jilted at his own wedding and falls in love with waitress, Julia Sullivan (the excellent Chloe Turner). However, Julia is engaged to rich businessman, Glen (Liam Mc Nally) whose example in life Robbie tries to follow. That is until he realises happiness is better than being rich. A sound philosophy.

But a production is not just about the main roles (as original Robbie in the film, Adam Sandler, often seems to forget) You need a strong cast, plus good characters, and meaningful sub-plots. Thankfully, there were; one such stand-out performance being that of Lisa Colvin-Grieve in the role of Holly. Great character and best number of the show with Lewis Doley (Sammy) in Right in Front of Your Eyes. Doley was also excellent as one half of the comic duo of bandmates with Robbie Love as George.

There were also good showings from Jill Hughes (Robbie’s Gran, Rosie) and Sarah Frances McCarthy (Julia’s Mum, Angie). One more to note was new member to the company, Harriet Marsland, who was exceptionally strong in her number, Let Me Come Home.

As well as the rousing opening number, It’s Your Wedding Day, there were decent tunes in Someday, Somebody Kill Me, Saturday Night in the City, All About the Green and Grow Old With You.

The Wedding Singer – The Crescent Theatre, Birmingham – 21 May 2022

The show was directed by John Morrison with Rhian Clements and musical direction was in the safe hands of Chris Corcoran. Choreography was arranged superbly by Sadie Turner who also seemed to have made an unplanned excursion on stage, as she was in the programme stating, “She was looking forward to watching the show.”

First scheduled two years ago and like many, hit by Covid. The Wedding Singer also marked Bournville’s 100th Anniversary as a company. There will be a Centenary Concert at The Crescent Theatre, Birmingham on October 22 this year to celebrate this. An amazing feat to reach such a landmark. Here’s to the next 100 years.

The Wedding Singer – The Crescent Theatre, Birmingham – 21 May 2022

Cheers.

Antony N Britt

I always love concerts by local theatre companies for two reasons. One, they highlight songs already known to me and two, I have, in the past, been introduced to some wonderful shows based on what I have seen at such productions.

I have experienced Bournville Musical Theatre Company many times, including their last three showcase concerts, so I looked forward to this one. The Magic of the Musicals was a simple but effective idea. Take eight top musicals, many which you cannot perform on the amateur circuit and give them 15-minute slots each. To achieve this for The Magic of the Musicals the company were split into two, taking four shows each. Easier for production and suitable for a small venue, but I’m not sure it worked on all the songs as the chorus was diluted on occasions. Really, you can’t have Step in Time with just three men.

The musicals on display were Wicked, Phantom of the Opera, Mary Poppins, Hamilton, Hairspray, Dear, Evan Hansen, West Side Story and The Greatest Showman. There were only two I hadn’t seen in full and wasn’t enamoured by the songs from Hamilton, but was by Evan Hansen, therefore a trip to see it when it finally appears near me, beckons.

With so may excellent shows, you may think it was hard to choose a favourite, but I did, and it’s one which surprised even myself. You see, 18 months after appearing in it and never wanting to hear the name West Side Story again, this was the section I enjoyed the most. Somewhere, sung by Sarah Frances McCarthy was exquisite while America led by Karen Lane and Jill Hughes brought back memories of watching from the sound booth each night. And finally, I was so impressed with Tonight which included strong performances from Yvonne Snowe, Liam McEvoy and Ellie Morrow.

It’s too much to mention everybody as this was certainly a team effort, and we all have our favourites. For me, standout numbers included Claire Brough and Sarah Debono with One Short Day while All I Ask of You, sung by Lucy Herd and Greg Boughton was probably the top tune of the night. Then, I cannot possibly choose between the two Mary Poppins’ in Sibs Ganley and Lily Moore for Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious and Spoonful of Sugar, respectively. As ever, Chloe Turner pulled off a magnificent solo with Burn while hats off to Phil Snowe and Lewis Doley for Timeless to Me. I can always admire those unfazed by having to send themselves up

I also enjoyed Waving Through a Window, a number which suited Peter Holmes well and You Will be Found (featuring David Page, Hannah Young and Lily Moore) was also excellent.

To wrap things up with Greatest Showman, I was impressed with Never Enough performed by Claire Brough (despite the curse of Am-Dram in mic problems), and This is Me with Rachel Fox and chorus.

Magic of the Musicals was produced by Lisa Colvin-Grieve and David Page with musical direction from Chris Corcoran. The choreography was then well-shared with Karen Lane, Abbie Jones, Sophie Wood, Kris Evans, Claire Brough, David Page, Stuart McDiarmid, Helen Gauntlett and Verity Wadesmith all chipping in.

Bournville’s next show is in April 2020 with The Wedding Singer and I am sure, as always, it will be exceptional.

Cheers.

Antony N Britt

This was my second experience of Bournville Musical Theatre Company, having witnessed their concert, Through the Decades, last year. Therefore, I hoped I would also be well entertained with a full show at the prestigious Crescent Theatre.

The Pajama Game – The Crescent Theatre, Birmingham – 6 June 2017

The theatre itself is a fine setting, even if my seat, F2, did collapse as I sat on it, meaning I had to move forward to an empty one. But these things happen, especially to me, and I should expect it by now.

With music and lyrics by Richard Adler and Jerry Ross, The Pajama Game tells of the Sleep-Tite Factory and the workers’ fight  for a pay rise. The conflict plays out aside a love story between new factory superintendent, Sid Sorokin and the head of the grievance committee, Babe Williams, both acted superbly with powerful vocals from Steve Kendall and Rhian Clement.

Kicking off the show was a good overture by the band who shone all night, although I feel we could have done with some lighting on the house curtains to heighten anticipation of what was to come. Then, after a brief introduction and title song from character, Vernon Hines (the excellent, John Morrison), the company pulled audience attention further onto the stage with Racing with the Clock. In fact, it was the combination of chorus vocals and choreography in this number, plus Hernando’s Hideaway and especially Once a Year Day, which stood out. So much movement and background activity going on, there was no chance of getting bored. And boredom was never an option because in the words of time management obsessive, Hines; “Tempus fugit, tempus fugit.” Time literally did fly as before I knew it, the first act ended for a quick drink and an eager return to the auditorium for more of the same. Pajama Game is a fast-moving show which seems a lot shorter than it is. And that’s a great testament to the original script of George Abbott and Richard Bissell.

Other enjoyable numbers included, I’m Not at All in Love, I’ll Never Be Jealous Again, Her Is, Small Talk, Hey There and Seven and a Half Cents. I’d have to say, though, my favourite of the night was Think of the Time I’ll Save. Well written comedy mixed with good choreography.

There were further comedic scenes and many of my favourites involved the duo of Hines and Gladys, for whom Natalie Buzzard gave an outstanding performance as Gladys. My main love in a personal acting sense is when I create or interpret a character, and Natalie did just that, truly becoming Gladys.

Now I’ve mentioned dance, but special acclaim must go to showpiece number, Steam Heat. This was a routine which certainly raised the temperature in the auditorium, courtesy once more of Natalie Buzzard along with Sarah Sheppard, Peter Holmes, Helen Gauntlett, Sophie Wood, Kai Murai and Verity Smith.

I can’t list everybody involved but giving fantastic support to the leads were Kris Evans (Prez), Jill Hughes (Mabel), Karen Lane (Mae), Jonathan Eastwood (Hasler), Rebecca Lowe (Poopsie), Chloe Turner (Brenda), John Clay (Pop), Phil Snow (Max), Adam Slack (Charley), Phil Holloway (Joe), and an energetic ensemble.

The Pajama Game was well directed by Ann-Louise McGregor with stunning musical direction from Chris Corcoran and sublime choreography by Sadie Turner.

The main thing to note, the cast looked like they enjoyed it and it’s always a cert that if you can project that, the audience will have a fantastic time too. I know I did.

The Pajama Game – The Crescent Theatre, Birmingham – 6 June 2017

The Pajama Game is on at the Crescent Theatre, Birmingham until Saturday 10 June with tickets still available at this link.

Cheers.

Antony N Britt

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