Tag Archive: Rock


And another one bites the dust.

Well, at least another musical off the tick list. I’m a massive fan of Queen, and a musical theatre fan, but I’d never seen We Will Rock You until this showing. Okay, I was supposed to see it two years ago, then Covid came calling. Finally, though, I got to experience what it’s all about.

We Will Rock You — Birmingham Hippodrome — 11 July 2022

I have never witnessed a show like We Will Rock You before. Or rather, never been faced with two extremes. On one hand, the cast and band with their musical performances were outstanding. As good as anything I have ever seen or heard. Then on the other, you have the book by Ben Elton. I can honestly say, it is awful. I’d compare it to a low-grade GCSE project, but that would be unfair to the students. Little or no plot, terrible script, and contrived that many lines are only there as an excuse to wring out another Queen number. Many of the songs are irrelevant to the plot as well: Crazy Little Thing Called Love, Flash, The Show Must Go On and Fat Bottomed Girls. All fillers which do not move the (tenuous at best) story along. Not only that, many are not even great Queen songs. No One But You (Only the Good Die Young), These are the Days of Our Lives and Radio Ga Ga are average at best. Even the title number, We Will Rock You, is vastly inferior to the fast live version from Queen gigs of old. At least we got a cameo of that in the bows.

And then there were the characters as written. Little to them and only made good by the excellence of those in the roles. We are introduced to Meat and Brit, whose characters are built up to be major influences on developments, then both are discarded, having served their purpose.

The dialogue was filled with song puns, like “I’ll tell you what I want, what I really, really, want,” then “I can’t get no satisfaction,” and the comment that the truth is “Blowin’ in the wind.” One or two maybe, but when you’re on the 30th pun, you want to scream. And that was just Act One. Similarly, did we really need four Covid references? Less is good; no chance of overkill. But you didn’t need to kill Ben Elton’s script as it was dead already in an act of suicide by the writer.

We Will Rock You — Birmingham Hippodrome — 11 July 2022

But I still enjoyed the show. Well, mostly. This was because, as I have mentioned, the cast were phenomenal. I can’t give them enough praise. In the role of Galileo was Ian McIntosh who was out of this world. I Want to Break Free, in particular. Similarly, Elena Skye gave one of the best vocal performances I have ever seen. Let’s face it, unless you can deliver with power, sass, and stage presence, don’t even try to sing Somebody to Love. Skye was brilliant. Best number of the night.

Michael McKell played Cliff and he gave a good rendition of These Are the Days of Our Lives. Likewise, Martina Ciabatti Mennel (Meat) and Edward Leigh (Brit) were on top of their game, the former, excellent in No One But You (Only the Good Die Young) and together with I Want it All.

The villains of the piece were Jennifer O’Leary (Killer Queen) and Adam Strong (Khashoggi). Both were superb. O’Leary with Don’t Stop Me Now and Strong giving us Seven Seas of Rhye, plus together on A Kind of Magic.

And I must mention the band: Zachary Fils, Matt Herbert, James Barber, Simon Croft, Neil Murray, and  Dave Cottrell. All delivered a sound of pure rock genius and it was wonderful to see them invited into the bows and take front stage at the end.

So, a standing ovation for the performances, they were excellent. Shame about the script, though. It says it all when there are only seven named principals in a show and half of them only used when needed. Ben Elton — Could have done a whole lot better. Perhaps he was Under Pressure when he wrote this book.

What! Bad pun? Jeez, it must be catching.

Cheers.

We Will Rock You — Birmingham Hippodrome — 11 July 2022

Antony N Britt 

Almost three years since I bought tickets for the Hella Mega Tour, I finally got to see Green Day. Two postponements due to Covid lockdowns later, was it worth the wait?

It wasn’t just Green Day on the bill, though, but also Weezer and Fall Out Boy, neither whom I had seen before, despite having several albums. There was also Amyl and the Sniffers with a short set, which I was unfortunately unable to see due to the staff at The John Smith Stadium being unable to cope with a large crowd on the pitch.

Yes, this is a gig review, but I must also mention the venue, this being the worst stadium experience I have ever had. Where on earth did John Smith’s organisers do their research … Hillsborough? Inadequate toilets, about a dozen burger vans and beer tent with hour-long queues to cater for thousands, then the entire pitch’s spectators directed in and out of the same narrow entry/exit. This was a disaster in the making, which thankfully did not happen.

On with the music.

I love Weezer, have always wanted to see them so although I bought tickets primarily for Green Day, Weezer were a delightful bonus. And I was not disappointed. From the moment Rivers Cosmo launched into Hash Pipe, then the brilliant Beverley Hills, the audience were entranced. Pork and Beans and Undone (The Sweater Song) soon followed among many more until ending with Say it Ain’t So and the classic Buddy Holly.

Green Day/Fall Out Boy/Weezer (Hella Mega Tour)—John Smith Stadium Huddersfield —25 June 2022 ©Antony N Britt 2022

There were also two strange choices of covers. Question. Should anyone cover Metalica’s Enter Sandman? Some songs are sacred. Then we had the horror of a cover of Toto’s Africa, a tune second only to Broken Wings by Mr. Mister for its ability to induce projectile vomiting.

But Weezer are a fun band. And a good band. What they do is entertain, and I certainly felt that at The John Smith Stadium.

Then came Fall Out Boy. I can’t say I’m a massive fan. I’ve listened to them but there is always a niggle over what they want to be. A pop band pretending to be rock? The music seems too manufactured for rock audiences at times. And it doesn’t help when your lead singer lacks the stage presence that bassist and chief songwriter, Pete Wentz has.

Green Day/Fall Out Boy/Weezer (Hella Mega Tour)—John Smith Stadium Huddersfield —25 June 2022

But it was a harmless set, with numbers including Sugar We’re Going Down, A Little Less Sixteen Candles, a Little More “Touch Me,” This Ain’t a Scene, It’s an Arms Race and Thnks Fr Th Mmrs. One thing of curiosity; halfway through we had a needless interruption for Fall Out Boy to change their already OTT set for a smaller one with a second drum set on a wobbly wooden house surrounded by cheap picket fencing which looked like a full-size version of a Year 7 Show and Tell Project. FOR NO REASON WHATSOEVER! Then they changed it back after a couple of songs. Bizarre.

But at least we had Green Day to come, although even with them being one of my top bands of all time, I felt short-changed. I’m used to getting nearly three hours of Green Day. Heck, you normally can’t get them off stage. What we had instead was a streamlined 90 minutes which was over before you knew it. I’d have preferred to have Fall Out Boy kicked into touch and give Green Day the extra hour.

But what they did was epic. You had the traditional Drunk Bunny beforehand and then what better opener than American Idiot? Holiday, Know Your Enemy and Boulevard of Broken Dreams followed before an interrupted Longview when Billie Joe Armstrong saw people struggling in the crowd. This was not an isolated incident as I saw evidence of several panic attacks in a poorly segregated arena. There was a further incident which led to an impromptu version of Ziggy Stardust by Billie Joe. It seemed like that anyway as the Bowie song didn’t make an appearance anywhere else on the UK leg of the tour.

Green Day/Fall Out Boy/Weezer (Hella Mega Tour)—John Smith Stadium Huddersfield —25 June 2022 ©Antony N Britt 2022

Welcome to Paradise, Hitchin a Ride, Brain Stew, Basket Case, When I Come Around, the hits kept coming. And there was still room for titans such as 21 Guns, Minority, Jesus of Suburbia and Wake Me Up When September Ends. We also had the staple live outing for King For a Day into the Isley Brother’s Shout. As is normal, a Green Day gig ends with Billie Joe solo for Good Riddance (Time of Your Life) before tickertape and pyrotechnics herald the return of band members Mike Dirnt and Tré Cool alongside touring musicians Jason White, Jason Freese and Kevin Preston. One thing that did disappoint, though; there was nothing played post 2009. Pity to ignore the last five albums.

A great showing from the stars of the show, even if it did leave me wanting more for valid reasons this time. But still, Green Day at least know how to put on a gig. Here’s to many more.

Cheers.

Antony N Britt 

*** Apologies for the lateness of this review. Covid came calling. *** 

It’s hard to describe Billie Eilish’s musical style: Ethereal, gothic, pop, dark pop. I can’t label it, and I don’t think you should. If anything, the correct term would be unique.

Billie Eilish

I came across Billie in 2019 after hearing a recommendation from Dave Grohl, and who was I to question the judgement of a rock god. So, I purchased the Don’t Smile at Me EP (All but an album itself) and after an eager wait, the first full release; When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go? And I secured tickets for her first arena tour. Brilliant. Then Covid came cancelling and a huge wait. Since then, a Bond theme (and an Oscar), plus a further album, Happier Than Ever, has established the still 20-year-old as one of the biggest acts on the planet so when tickets went on sale again for 2022, I was first in the queue.

The set was simple. Huge stage with just brother/song writing partner, Finneas O’Connell, plus drummer, Andrew Marshall present; it gave more focus to the star of the show. There were some backing track vocals, but this was always going to be the case as many of Eilish’s songs are double tracked and more. But the main force was live to profound effect.

Kicking off with an explosive entrance, we had Bury a Friend, followed by I Didn’t Change My Number and immediately, the audience were captive of the magic and energy Billie Eilish releases. Everyone lapped it up, including me. You could call it hypnotism at times. It was how I like to enjoy gigs, immersed and totally lost in the experience.

Billie Eilish—Utilita Areana Birmingham—15 June 2022 © Antony N Britt 2022

There are so many good numbers: You Should See Me in a Crown, My Strange Addiction, When the Party’s Over, NDA, Oxytocin, and not forgetting cameos of older hits like Bellyache and Ocean Eyes. A history of dancing injuries and sporting kinesiology tape, this didn’t stop Eilish giving a massive energetic performance which she seemed to enjoy as much as the audience. Billie Eilish is refreshing. There are no airs and graces, she is not full of herself, and clearly takes no shit, often concerned for people struggling in the crush of an audience.

Billie Eilish—Utilita Areana Birmingham—15 June 2022 © Antony N Britt 2022

My top numbers of the night were Getting Older, Bad Guy, and especially the finale of Happier Than Ever, a song which is my current favourite tune of the moment. And there were others that I found a love for which I hadn’t thought of before. In this case, Lost Cause, which I cannot stop singing now.

Billie Eilish—Utilita Areana Birmingham—15 June 2022 © Antony N Britt 2022

It’s easy to see why Eilish is so popular with both audiences and peers. There is an honesty and stripped-back approach to the music that makes it pure. And there is something in the lyrics which not only resonate with the young, but also oldies like me. It was also wonderful to relive the experience with an identical set broadcast on TV from Glastonbury a week later. I was still buzzing, and it took me back to that wonderful night.

One of the best gigs I have ever been to. Here’s to many more. 

Cheers.

Antony N Britt 

Debbie Harry is nearly 77. Seventy-seven, God-dammit! I don’t know if that makes her old or me feel it. You see, 45 years ago, when I first discovered Blondie, I was barely fourteen years old myself. Once again, I am blessed that Blondie, like many of my favourite rock bands, are still about. I must have good taste for longevity. Okay, so due to Chris Steins’ ill-health, there were only two original members on stage: Debbie Harry and the brilliant Clem Burke on drums. But we also had Glen Matlock on bass, which was a bonus for me and the rock alumni of 1977.

Kicking off where it all began with X-Offender, a packed arena went back in time and unless you were in the first few rows (as I was) you’d be hard pressed to believe you were not seeing the band at their height during that era.

Harry hasn’t lost it a bit. Sure, after a handful of numbers, the heels had to come off as in her own words, she needed to get serious. But to still do a high-energy set lasting almost two hours is incredible.

We listened to hit after hit, but inexplicably, not Denis. That didn’t matter, and it was only afterwards I realised it had been omitted. There are so many more in the catalogue to rave about. Not just the early years, but from the post 1998 revival: Maria, My Monster, What I Heard, Long Time, Mother and best of all, one of my favourites, No Exit. All greeted with similar Rapture as the song of the same name.

But you also had the classics: Sunday Girl, Picture This, Dreaming, Call Me, Atomic, Heart of Glass … the list goes on. I was also overjoyed to hear Fade Away and Radiate in such an incredible set.

Save the best until last, Blondie finished with One Day or Another, a song so massive and popular, but never a single in the UK (until it charted digitally in 2013). This is the measure of a great song. No mainstream release but instantly recognisable.

The euphoria of the audience swept through the arena in one of the best gigs I have seen. Yes, even at that age, Harry rocks. Whereas myself and my partner (late 50s) hobbled back to the car afterwards, near unable to walk. Whatever Debbie Harry has, I’ll take some myself. Brilliant.

Cheers.

Antony N Britt

Somebody once said to me that there were better Queen tribute bands out there than Queen & Adam Lambert. Now, I rarely do tribute acts, apart from when you can no longer see the real thing like Queen. So, how did Supreme Queen measure up to the dazzling legacy and did it beat the modern-day incarnation of the band?

Well, visually, it took time because obviously, they were not Queen, but the sound! With a voice so like Freddy Mercury, lead singer, Scott Maley immediately had me believing I was listening to the real thing. And that, I guess, is what you need with tributes. For tributes are what they are and to be successful you do need to believe. After a few songs, I forgot the physical differences and I experienced legends of rock.

Starting off with One Vision and Tie Your Mother Down, Supreme Queen treated a packed audience to hit after hit: Seven Seas of Rhye, Keep Yourself Alive, It’s a Kind of Magic and Under Pressure were among 25 instantly recognisable classics. I was also overjoyed to hear the fast (and, superior) version of We Will Rock You.

The set in the main modelled itself on the stadium tour songs of the mid-1980s. I guess when you have such an enormous catalogue, things must give way. Therefore, sparse on the early albums and nothing from the final three. A shame, but it’s probably what the fans want. And to be there, the audience most definitely were fans of Queen. Such energy and enthusiasm from Supreme Queen transferred onto those watching. And not just the oldies who formed the majority. It was also good to see younger members; teenagers with parents next to me and three children all under eleven in front with their family. It was clear all were brought up on the band, gloriously indoctrinated and now having the time of their lives. Brilliant. You see, we form many of our tastes based on those of others. I, myself, was into Queen aged 10, all because my elder sister had Queen albums in 1973 while my classmates went on to like The Bay City Rollers, .

The show divided into two sets, allowing audience and band time to recuperate and then we had more of the same: I Want to Break Free, Another One Bites the Dust, Radio Ga Ga and, of course, Bohemian Rhapsody. Mimicking Queen shows of old, Supreme Queen ended with We Will Rock You (single version) and We Are the Champions.

What we also had were two long drum and guitar solos. Now, I’m not a fan of Brian May and Roger Taylor’s musical masturbations, but they were mainstays of the original shows throughout Queen’s career, so I can see why they’re included.

Supporting Scott Maley’s Mercury was Luke Timmins (Brian May), Alan Wallbanks (John Deacon) and Allan Brown (Roger Taylor). In addition, we had Ben Marshall as the keyboard player Queen didn’t have but contributing the pieces Freddy Mercury would play. All were excellent. Let’s face it, to pull off being convincing Queens, you’ve got to be damn good at what you do, and Supreme Queen were that and more.

A thoroughly wonderful night. I will be back. Long live Queen.

Cheers.

Antony N Britt

I shall start with something unconnected to The Coral by stating that the O2 Institute in Birmingham was the most difficult venue to get into (on numerous counts) in over 40 years of attending music gigs and theatres. And with a management policy ignorant of autism.

So, I was in a bad mood before we started, and I was looking for The Coral to lift me. Thankfully, they did, although I was not particularly a fan of the show format, being a 20th anniversary celebration of their self-titled debut album.

Don’t get me wrong, I love the 2002 offering; it has great tracks. But I also like songs from the subsequent nine, therefore, when the opening 11 numbers come from one album, the remainder only average one per subsequent release in a shorter set than most gigs with just 19 numbers in total.

From the first album set and following Spanish Main, standout numbers were Shadows Fall, I Remember, Dreaming of You and the epic Goodbye. I say epic because played live, the extended instrumental break during Goodbye is out of this world. Bisecting the album and second set was the hidden track Time Travel while the band took a short break. And then we had the best of the rest.

Starting off with Bill McCai and Pass it On, The Coral also treated the crowd to a couple from the 2021 release, Coral Island. Now this is where I felt the most disappointment because Coral Island was one of the best releases of last year. To only get two tracks from it, and a double album at that, left me feeling short-changed. The two on the night were Faceless Angel and Lover Undiscovered, but I would dearly have loved to hear Vacancy, among others. Still, of the remaining offerings we did get In the Morning, Holy Revelation and my own personal favourite Coral track, Jaqueline.

The Coral produce original music with a touch of nostalgia, sometimes harking back to the psychedelia of the 60s and fluctuating between melodic and raw energy. The sort of music you can lose yourself in, and long may it continue. In addition to the full-time current line-up of the band (James Skelley, Paul Duffey, Nick Power, Ian Skelley and Paul Molloy), Zak Mc Donnell and Danny Murphey join live proceedings to achieve a massive sound which in a smaller venue like the O2 Institute, makes for something special. I just wish we would have had more from them, even just a further 10 minutes.

So, not the most enjoyable Coral gig I have been to, due to the set content, but still a great night out.

Cheers.

Antony N Britt

First and foremost, I’m a Stranglers fan. So much so, in my 2015 novel, Dead Girl Stalking, my protagonist had a poster of them on his bedroom wall, and he defended the band from the derision of his girlfriend whose tastes were probably more R&B. I even acknowledged the band at the front of the book as having provided a running soundtrack while writing it. So if you ever do read Dead Girl Stalking, have a little Don’t Bring Harry or Baroque Bordello at the back of your mind.

My own love affair with The Stranglers began in 1977 with a BASF C-90 taped recording of Rattus Norvegicus. A multitude of albums and 21 gigs attended, that dalliance long ago became a full-blooded relationship. I have many favourite bands but if I’m honest, the one I could not live without are The Stranglers.

The last two years have affected everyone in varying ways, none more so than the Family in Black. The loss of Dave Greenfield in 2020 was that of a family member. A constant companion, friend, and lover, all through the years I have followed the band.

Yeah, I admit, when I first heard the news of Dave’s passing, I thought, “Well, that’s it.” I couldn’t see how the band could continue. Members, some of them huge, have departed over the years but along with the trademark bass of Jean-Jacques Burnel, Dave Greenfield’s keys are the sound of The Stranglers. So I was glad when the tour still took place in memory of Dave and ecstatic when the 18th studio album, Dark Matters, was posthumously released with Dave’s keyboards present. Within the opening minute of Water, I fell in love with Dave and The Stranglers all over again. But how would they be live without the great man on stage?

The answer was – superb. From the opening bars of Waltz in Black, I had that buzz I’d not felt for so long. Then the euphoria as the band took to the stage and launched into Toiler on the Sea. The Stranglers were back.

One massive change as Toby Hounsham had the unenviable task of taking the keyboards and was described by guitarist/vocalist Baz Warne as having massive balls to do so. Toby was brilliant, in fact, reproducing Greenfield’s arpeggios and sounding just as good as any other Stranglers gig I have attended. It was also nice to see Toby well received by the faithful, thankful, like myself, that the magic is not over. As JJ Burnel stated in the past, The Stranglers are a brand, not a band, so there is no reason they should ever end. I guess it’ll happen one day but aged 58 myself, I can be selfish and hope they don’t go just yet.

On the night we were treated to classic after classic: Something Better Change, Always the Sun, Strange Little Girl, Go Buddy Go, Golden Brown, Hanging Around, Sometimes and Skin Deep among many others. But we also had six new songs from the brilliant Dark Matters. Water, Last Men on the Moon and This Song, fans are already familiar with, having done the circuit on the last tours before Covid. But there was also a debut for White Stallion, which I believe will become a permanent fixture in future tours like Relentless has been since 2006.

It’s always good to witness The Stranglers gel. I’ve followed them from near the beginning but can honestly say in recent years they have never been better live. JJ and Baz come across as two who are on the same page. This also applies to the newer recruits. Jim Macauly on drums has been with the band several years now and even contributed to songs on Dark Matters. And along with Toby Hounsham, provided great backing vocals on several numbers, just as Mr. Greenfield did for many years.

The other two new songs were performed as a JJ/Baz duet during the first of two encores. The short acoustic, The Lines was excellent before a poignant and highly emotional version of And if You Should See Dave. Written as a tribute, there was many a watery eye during the line, “This is where your solo would go.” The empty keyboard lit to all round applause and cheers.

As the case is so often, The Stranglers finished with No More Heroes, always guaranteed to bring the house down. Thankfully, I do still have heroes and hopefully, mine will be here for some time yet.

Cheers.

Antony N Britt

It’s no secret that I’m a lover of Rock amongst many genres of music, including being a massive fan of Musical Theatre. Therefore, when worlds collide and bring two of my favourites together, I’m going to be interested.

Poseidon, the debut single from the astounding Teej achieves this mix of theatre and metal in excellent fashion. It’s a story of a ruler who spends years creating a beautiful world, only for its inhabitants to let it go to ruin. Our singer and heroine then teams up with the Lord Poseidon to destroy the world that the people did not appreciate. This brings so many parallels with the likes of modern-day heroines like Greta Thunberg who cry out at the devastation of this world by the hands of its own people. Poseidon tells a similar tale. Take care of what you have now, or regret the loss afterwards.

“They’ll miss the world they wish they had valued.”

From a soulful beginning to a climax of Evanesence proportions, Poseidon takes us on a journey to leave you breathless. It’s nice, also to listen to someone unafraid to mix these and many more genres and go outside the box. Oh yes, we like ‘outside the box.’ As we also like dramatic and spectacular. This song, I am delighted to say, has all these elements.

Teej is the new incarnation for Katie Teitge, frontperson of former Birmingham metal band, Insurgent. And she is well supported here on bass by Jake Brettle from that same late lamented line-up. Completing a trio involved on the track is Jake Elwell (Fury) on guitar and drums with Elwell also producing and mastering the song.

I enjoyed Poseidon a great deal and look forward to more from Teej, as I am certain there will be. I believe we may be witness now to something huge coming our way in future years. Because as debuts go, this is a classic. The Lord Poseidon would be well pleased.

Poseidon is available from 20 April 2021 on all major platforms.

Cheers.

Antony N Britt

Alice Cooper is one artist I never tire of seeing, and at the age of 71, you wonder how many more opportunities you’ll get. Sorry, Alice, but death comes to all of us. However, I’m sure he won’t mind as here we have one performer who has made death a trademark by including large parts of it in his act.

Yes, I had no hesitation buying tickets to see the man and the occasion was made even more enjoyable by The Stranglers being the support. One of my favourite bands and the 20th time I had seen them. Great they were, too (as always), but this gig was not about them. It was a night for The Greatest Showman.

With the latest incarnation of touring band, including Chuck Garrick (Bass), Ryan Roxie (Guitar), Nita Strauss (Lead and Rhythm), Tommy Henricksen (Rhythm and Lead) and Glen Sobel (Drums), we were immediately treated to a massive opener of Feed My Frankenstein (Complete with giant monster). Then came No More Mister Nice Guy and if any neutrals in the audience were unsure what they were in for, they now knew. Assisted in theatrics by Mrs. Alice Cooper (Sheryl Goddard) as the nurse, this wasn’t just a rock show, it was musical theatre, hard-core.

Notable numbers for me were Eighteen, Poison and He’s Back (The Man Behind the Mask), the latter complete with machete wielding maniac who slays groupies onstage. Then we had the grand medley of Steven/Dead Babies/We Are the Dead. As I say, theatrics in the extreme but nobody was complaining as two macabre giant babies in work clothes led Mr. Cooper to the guillotine. But enough of the effects, even if you couldn’t see, this was one of the best audio experiences going, and such atmosphere.

Then, into the encore and Under My Wheels before the grand finale of Schools Out with a little bit of Another Brick in the Wall for good measure. This finale lasted nearly ten minutes with huge dead baby balloons flying around the audience, plus ticker tape and streamers. We didn’t care. This was great and such was the performance, it simply flew by.

Alice Cooper certainly knows how to put on a show, and it was great to see many young people in the arena, including an under-10 next to me who jumped and sang with the rest of them.

I still wonder how many more times we can expect to see Alice Cooper, as with so many of that era, but if you never have seen them, I recommend it. At least once.

Cheers.

Antony N Britt

Insurgent
NOUN
1. a person fighting against a government or invading force; a rebel or revolutionary. “an attack by armed insurgents”
synonyms:
rebel · revolutionary · revolutionist · mutineer · agitator · subversive ·
ADJECTIVE
1. rising in active revolt. “alleged links with insurgent groups”

The venue is The Flapper, formerly known as The Longboat once upon a time and a regular haunt of mine in the 1980s. But there is nothing 80s about Insurgent who are fresh and an exciting addition to the home of heavy metal in Birmingham.

With a new band you’d maybe expect rawness, but what you have with Insurgent is polished professionalism which gives the feel they’ve been at this for years. Maybe they have, but not collectively as Insurgent were founded by guitarist, Joe Rowley less than twelve months ago in the winter of 2018.

Some bands give a general feel of everything melding into one. This one, however, are nothing like that. There is a controlled blend of sound which you can listen to and isolate each instrument’s contribution, if you wish to do so. Jake Brettle (Bass) and Mike Tabone (Drums) compliment Rowley on guitar in excellent fashion. But then when you add the essential instrument of Katie Teitge on vocals, Insurgent turn into something special. And what a voice Teitge has with power and emotion at the same time. This was shown no better than during Colours Bleed.

It’s hard to comment on music you have no prior knowledge of but after an hour, I thought I knew Insurgent a good deal. Launching with My Sentence Awaits and Illusionary, the crowd were immediately into the band. In addition to the openers, we had the more thoughtful Dogma before eventually covering Slipknot’s, Duality. A brave move when you cover a well-known song, but Insurgent pulled it off with ease.

Finally, we were treated to the band’s debut single, Counterpart, which also went down a storm and is as good as anything else up there in the halls of rock.

The music and lyrics are written by Joe Rowley, but each member adds their own special elements to songs which have a wide outlook of general thoughts. Thoughts which appeal to more than just the heavy metal scene. I know it did with me.

Currently working on a follow-up single, Insurgent’s Facebook page describes themselves as creating new and exciting heavy metal music that aims to change the Birmingham music scene. Whether the current scene is good or bad, change is good and the world needs insurgents, and in this band, we have them. So, if you’re in the area, check them out and share the music. You won’t be disappointed.

Cheers.

Antony N Britt

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