Tag Archive: Music


Alice Cooper is one artist I never tire of seeing, and at the age of 71, you wonder how many more opportunities you’ll get. Sorry, Alice, but death comes to all of us. However, I’m sure he won’t mind as here we have one performer who has made death a trademark by including large parts of it in his act.

Yes, I had no hesitation buying tickets to see the man and the occasion was made even more enjoyable by The Stranglers being the support. One of my favourite bands and the 20th time I had seen them. Great they were, too (as always), but this gig was not about them. It was a night for The Greatest Showman.

With the latest incarnation of touring band, including Chuck Garrick (Bass), Ryan Roxie (Guitar), Nita Strauss (Lead and Rhythm), Tommy Henricksen (Rhythm and Lead) and Glen Sobel (Drums), we were immediately treated to a massive opener of Feed My Frankenstein (Complete with giant monster). Then came No More Mister Nice Guy and if any neutrals in the audience were unsure what they were in for, they now knew. Assisted in theatrics by Mrs. Alice Cooper (Sheryl Goddard) as the nurse, this wasn’t just a rock show, it was musical theatre, hard-core.

Notable numbers for me were Eighteen, Poison and He’s Back (The Man Behind the Mask), the latter complete with machete wielding maniac who slays groupies onstage. Then we had the grand medley of Steven/Dead Babies/We Are the Dead. As I say, theatrics in the extreme but nobody was complaining as two macabre giant babies in work clothes led Mr. Cooper to the guillotine. But enough of the effects, even if you couldn’t see, this was one of the best audio experiences going, and such atmosphere.

Then, into the encore and Under My Wheels before the grand finale of Schools Out with a little bit of Another Brick in the Wall for good measure. This finale lasted nearly ten minutes with huge dead baby balloons flying around the audience, plus ticker tape and streamers. We didn’t care. This was great and such was the performance, it simply flew by.

Alice Cooper certainly knows how to put on a show, and it was great to see many young people in the arena, including an under-10 next to me who jumped and sang with the rest of them.

I still wonder how many more times we can expect to see Alice Cooper, as with so many of that era, but if you never have seen them, I recommend it. At least once.

Cheers.

Antony N Britt

Insurgent
NOUN
1. a person fighting against a government or invading force; a rebel or revolutionary. “an attack by armed insurgents”
synonyms:
rebel · revolutionary · revolutionist · mutineer · agitator · subversive ·
ADJECTIVE
1. rising in active revolt. “alleged links with insurgent groups”

The venue is The Flapper, formerly known as The Longboat once upon a time and a regular haunt of mine in the 1980s. But there is nothing 80s about Insurgent who are fresh and an exciting addition to the home of heavy metal in Birmingham.

With a new band you’d maybe expect rawness, but what you have with Insurgent is polished professionalism which gives the feel they’ve been at this for years. Maybe they have, but not collectively as Insurgent were founded by guitarist, Joe Rowley less than twelve months ago in the winter of 2018.

Some bands give a general feel of everything melding into one. This one, however, are nothing like that. There is a controlled blend of sound which you can listen to and isolate each instrument’s contribution, if you wish to do so. Jake Brettle (Bass) and Mike Tabone (Drums) compliment Rowley on guitar in excellent fashion. But then when you add the essential instrument of Katie Teitge on vocals, Insurgent turn into something special. And what a voice Teitge has with power and emotion at the same time. This was shown no better than during Colours Bleed.

It’s hard to comment on music you have no prior knowledge of but after an hour, I thought I knew Insurgent a good deal. Launching with My Sentence Awaits and Illusionary, the crowd were immediately into the band. In addition to the openers, we had the more thoughtful Dogma before eventually covering Slipknot’s, Duality. A brave move when you cover a well-known song, but Insurgent pulled it off with ease.

Finally, we were treated to the band’s debut single, Counterpart, which also went down a storm and is as good as anything else up there in the halls of rock.

The music and lyrics are written by Joe Rowley, but each member adds their own special elements to songs which have a wide outlook of general thoughts. Thoughts which appeal to more than just the heavy metal scene. I know it did with me.

Currently working on a follow-up single, Insurgent’s Facebook page describes themselves as creating new and exciting heavy metal music that aims to change the Birmingham music scene. Whether the current scene is good or bad, change is good and the world needs insurgents, and in this band, we have them. So, if you’re in the area, check them out and share the music. You won’t be disappointed.

Cheers.

Antony N Britt

It’s an amazing injustice that despite the fact I purchased this band’s debut album, Showbiz, when it was first released, added to the fact I have seen most rock bands I like many, many times, I had never seen Muse until Tuesday September 17 2019. No reason, other than their shows were always in the wrong place at the wrong time. Therefore, I am glad this has now been rectified.

Watching Muse isn’t just attending a rock concert, it’s witnessing a theatrical spectacle and although I am usually more in favour of letting the music do the talking, this approach works for Muse. And it’s that mix of special effects combined with kick-ass rock which sticks in the memory most. From laser spectaculars, and an army of choreographed robot dancers, to the appearance at the end of a giant … erm, thing (Some sort of robot, monster, I think). The whole experience was immense.

Straight from the off, Matt Bellamy, Chris Wolstenholme and Dominic Howard showcased their recent album, Simulation Theory, throughout the show. Pressure is my favourite of the newer stuff, and I reckon I’d class it up there with the best in what is now 20 years of recording success.

But we also had the classics in Uprising, Plug in Baby, Supermassive Black Hole and Time is Running Out. I was also pleased to hear my favourite Muse track, Hysteria get an airing, and Starlight, too.

Towards the end, we had a mash up of Stockholm Syndrome, New Born, Assassin, Reapers and The Handler, all combined with that giant colossus on stage. Accompanying this, the release of hundreds of giant silver and black balloons, and yes, they were as massive as the music and effects.

I was lucky enough to have chosen a spot in the centre of the arena to stand. Fortunate, I say, as this had me within 20 yards of Bellamy and Co when they performed at the end of a catwalk, which they did on numerous occasions, including Dig Down.

To top off a brilliant night we had the mega Knights of Cydonia and everyone went home happy, including myself as I departed, having collared a huge black balloon as a memento, although it was a bugger to get in the car.

So, a late inclusion for Muse into my live arena, but hopefully, not the last from this wonderful band.

Cheers.

Antony N Britt.

I must admit, I don’t listen to contemporary pop a great deal these days. In a world full of X-Idols who’ve got talent and a nice voice, I’m happy to stick to my rock roots. And I’m not alone. I often hear comments about older music on the lines of, “Well, it’s better than the rubbish you hear these days.” And in most cases, this is true. However, when you least expect it, somebody comes along to shake the foundations and offer something a bit different.Album Review – Billie Eilish: When We All fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?

It’s difficult to describe Billie Eilish’s style. I guess a magical blend of good tunes, music and voice, then that rare full house of meaningful lyrics which hit home not only to the teen generation, but older listeners like myself. It’s a case of, “I don’t know why I think this is fantastic, but I do.” And any artist with an endorsement from Dave Grohl is going to be worth a try.

Billie Eilish comes from an acting/musical family and along with brother, Phineas O’Connell, produced When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go? The album is a follow-up to numerous singles and EP, Don’t Smile at Me. Okay, perhaps EP is a misrepresentation for that first offering has a duration greater than most Beatles albums. At 17, Billie is the youngest artist to go direct to number 1 in the UK album charts. She comes across as a free spirit, an individual, and how can you not love someone whose middle name is Pirate?

Recorded in the home bedroom, the album has everything. From the kick-ass opening of Bad Guy, we are taken on a journey which states you’re going to have as much fun listening to it as they did in the making. An incredible use of multi-track vocals is nowhere better displayed than Xanny which states Eilish has never had or will have need for drugs. The previously released single, You Should See Me in a Crown, is massive in terms of impact as is the melancholy, When the Party’s Over. And then we have Bury a Friend, surely one of the best songs of the decade. This is not to say album tracks don’t match up. All the Good Girls Go to Hell could be played on repeat all day long as is also the case with My Strange Addiction and Ilomilo.

If you check out YouTube, there is video of the full set of a recent gig in London and you can see the effect on the young audience there. But I enjoyed watching it as well. Here we have a person with something to say, and long may she continue saying it.

Album Review – Billie Eilish: When We All fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?

Cheers.

Antony N Britt.

This was my fourth time seeing Frank Turner and first in an arena venue. And as with previous experiences, one thing you can guarantee from Frank is entertainment. So much energy, the guy and the band keep going at a breath-taking pace, much like Frank’s work schedule.

Frank Turner and the Sleeping Souls – Birmingham Arena – 22 January 2019 © Antony N Britt 2019

We are informed this is show 2299. Now, even if you divide that by his adult years, it still averages out at well over one hundred shows a year. Then you consider the seven studio albums since 2007 and you appreciate the tag of The Busiest Guy in Rock. However, there is a downside. With a huge catalogue of songs, it does mean many of my favourites are left out of a two-hour set. Dammit, I’ve still never heard Father’s Day live!

Still, with each new studio album comes a host of material and 2018s Be More Kind is no exception in quality: 1933, Blackout and Little Changes are but to mention three of these. Mix with the back catalogue and you have a show that delights the fan and hopefully pleases recent converts.

Always great to hear Photosynthesis, Recovery, The Road, Don’t Try This at Home and I Still Believe. Also, my atheist anthem, Glory Hallelujah. Heck, my evening was complete. Well, complete bar Father’s Day, Frank. It was also pleasing to hear Love, Ire and Song, not played for a few years, apparently.

Frank Turner and the Sleeping Souls – Birmingham Arena – 22 January 2019 © Antony N Britt 2019

We had music, crowd surfing, plus a little dance with audience members for the final number, Four Simple Words. I was exhausted merely watching. Good humour and banter along with crowd participation. And an apology for missing Birmingham out last time around. In fact, this was my first reunion with the man in five years as previous local shows have coincided with productions of my own. I hope the next isn’t too far away, probably at this rate, with a new album. And let’s not forget the Sleeping Souls: Ben Lloyd, Tarrant Anderson, Matt Nasir and Nigel Powell, always a magnificent contribution to the show.

The only thing I would note as a minor negative is nothing to do with Frank Turner, it’s just the crowd were not as lively as my previous encounters. This could be to do with a larger arena venue and maybe the energy is less likely to be infectious due to the greater number of people to share it with. I didn’t care. It was a great show by a great showman.


Frank Turner - Be More Kind Signed

Cheers.

Antony N Britt

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