Tag Archive: Solihull


The first thing to note is the formerly named, Coleshill Operatic Society, are now Coleshill on Stage. I like that. We all need to evolve, and musical theatre is no different. Still, names change, but I am happy to say the quality remains with Jack and the Beanstalk exceeding enjoyment of 2019’s Cinderella.

Full of life from an exuberant opening of Pharrell Williams’ Happy to the finale of We Go Together, the cast looked to be having as good a time as the audience. And there was the clincher. Those in the seats loved every minute and showed appreciation likewise.

I’m not going to bore with the plot; it’s Jack and the Beanstalk, for heaven’s sake. However, I did wonder how they were going to represent a giant with an amateur theatre budget. A simple unseen, booming voice of Brian Blessed proportions was the answer, vocals supplied by Adam Richardson. Did the job perfect.

In the lead role of Jack, we had a traditional principal boy in Molly Bennett. This is a part Molly carried of to perfection, excelling particularly in Evermore. Then, combining well with the equally outstanding Hannah Trowman (Princess Charlotte), was a lovely rendition of Rule the World.

However, if it’s tradition you want, there is nothing more pantomime than the dame. Therefore, it was great to see Lloyd Cast offering a more Edna Turnblad female than the rapidly outdating hairy-chested, graveled voice dame. The character of Dotty Dimple worked well, especially during Man, I Feel Like a Woman.

But panto needs a huge helping of comic relief and there was much on offer with the character of Simple Simon, played in great fashion by Kelvin McArdle. It’s a part of musical theatre I love myself, to engage and interact with the audience. And no mean feat to pull it off, either. This was no more evident than during the audience participation of Dotty Dimple Had a Farm. Great for kids and adults. Not that the adults would admit it, though.

In addition to a giant, Jack also contended with two seriously good baddies in Piccalilli (Natalie Bracher) and Rancid (Chris Britt). Both were superb in their acting, making their characters totally believable. And speaking of good character acting, I was equally impressed by Lucia Owen-Small who worked well with her partner Ray Rogers as the incompetent duo, Snatchet and Scarper.

Completing a fine principal cast we had John Kerr (King Crumble), Joyce Eyre (Queen Crumble), Pauline Peach (Fairy Sugardust) and Grace Lambert (Humphrey). Finally, a pantomime cow doing the rounds in the combined form of Claire Willson and Rachel Evans. I wonder which was the butt of the jokes …

Great musical numbers for me were Wake Up Boo, Monster Mash, If I Didn’t Have You and Celebration. My favourite, though, for personal reasons was Walking on Sunshine, a song I chose to end my self-penned show, Sleeping Beauty in 2018. Nostalgic moments indeed.

The director of Jack and the Beanstalk was Tom Willson with excellent musical direction and choreography from Chris Corcoran and Rachel Evans, respectively. All on the production team deserve credit because the whole cast lived their parts. It’s a sign of a job well done when you feel you know these characters, and that was the case for me. It was nice as well to see so many younger members on stage. They are the future of musical theatre and deserve inclusion.

Therefore, another great night out in the hands of Coleshill on Stage. Next production is the iconic Oliver. I shall be there.

Cheers.

Antony N Britt

Ever since I was in a concert which featured a musical number from this show, I have wanted to see The Producers. More than that; I want to play Max Bialystock, a role only equaled by Daryl Van Horne as far as my theatre dreams go.

I’d not seen anything from St Augustine’s MTC before, but I had heard good of their reputation. Therefore, I had high hopes for my first viewing of this Mel Brooks masterpiece. And I was not disappointed.

The Producers tells of Max Bialystock, Broadway’s worst producer, and his attempt, aided by accountant, Leo Bloom, to contrive a massive flop and the worst show in history, thus pocketing the invested money once it folds after opening night. Of course, things do not go as planned.

The Producers is fast, funny and full of excellent numbers. Add to that fine performances and good production, then you have a hit. Ironic that a show about how to make a flop is such a smash, notably reflected in a record-breaking 12 Tony Awards after opening on Broadway in 2001.

As I have said, such a good show, but a script can only do so much. You need a team capable of fulfilling the potential, and in St Augustine’s they had that and more. I see a lot of theatre, both amateur and professional, and I would not only rate The Producers as being one of the best of the unpaid kind, but in my top five of all time, including those on tour and West End.

Leading the line was John Morrison as Max. Quite one of the best character actors I have seen and having witnessed previous performances in other shows, the main draw for me going in the first place. From the King of Broadway to the brilliant Betrayed, the audience saw a performance up there with the best.

But then there was also Richard Perks as Leo Bloom, equally as good and both he and Morrison were magnificent in their collaborations on We Can Do It and Where Did We Go Right? And it does not end there. There is such a wealth of good character opportunities in this show and we had no weak links on this occasion: Nicki Willets (Ulla), Nick Salter (Franz Liebkind), Mike Bentley (Roger DeBris) and Lochlann Hannon (Carmen Ghia) were outstanding.

Other top tunes for me included: I Wanna Be a Producer, Der Gutten Tag Hop-Clop, Keep it Gay, When You’ve Got it, Flaunt It, It’s Bad Luck to Say Good Luck on Op’ning Night and Prisoners of Love. Best of all for me was Along Came Bialy. However, my favourite moment in the entire show is when Ulla paints the entire office white. Loved it.

“She’s even painted the numbers on the combination!”

I can’t praise highly enough, also, the production team: Veronica Walsh (Producer/Director), Stephen Powell (Musical Director), Sharyn Hastings (Choreography) and Tony Walsh (Stage Manager) can be so proud of their efforts.

A marvelous company, full of good acting, song and fabulous dance. What a show!

Picture blatantly stolen from St Augustine’s Facebook page.

Cheers.

Antony N Britt

Over the past couple of years I’ve tasted a variety of musical theatre companies and looked forward to Throroughly Modern Millie at The Core Theatre, Solihull. I’d not seen anything by St Alphege Musical Productions Society (STAMPS) before, so didn’t know what to expect.

Thoroughly Modern Millie – The Core Theatre, Solihull – 5 November 2016

So how were they? A nice showing where Becky Willetts as Millie gave a good performance and both Miss Dorothy, played by Lucy Clarke and Trevor Graydon (Kris Evans) were excellent. Also, the character of Jimmy Smith played by Jack Walsh was likewise good, but I would expect nothing less from a former student of BOA.

Stand out songs for me were Speed Test and Falling in Love. We also had good choreography in most numbers, but nothing in Muquin which could have done with being sent up more. There were also lost opportunities for jokes. For instance, failing to capitalise on the George Gershwin, Rhapsody in Blue gag.

Also giving good performances on the night were Fran Foster (Muzzy Van Hossmere), Rosie Asher (Mrs Meers) and Kim Bradshaw (Miss Flannery).

Musical direction came from Phil Ypres-Smith with Viv Morrison as director and choreographer.

A decent enough offering after what must have been many months hard work.

Cheers.
Nick

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