Tag Archive: West Midlands


Sun is shinin’ in the sky. 
There ain’t a cloud in sight. 
It’s stopped rainin’,  everybody’s in the play 
and don’t you know 
it’s a beautiful new day,  hey! hey! 

Words familiar All Over the World, but the faces here are a little different. That’s because this band is a tribute; a tribute to the wonderful sound of Jeff Lynne and the Electric Light Orchestra

ELO Encounter—The Crescent Theatre Birmingham—16 September 2022

I have previously said that I only do tributes when the real thing is not around anymore, but although you can get Jeff Lynne’s ELO (at exorbitant prices) when he tours, the chance for a little Blue Sky at short notice was too good to pass up. 

Formed several years ago by the Lownes Brothers, The ELO Encounter give you just that. Not simply a performance of numbers, but encountering the original band with a loving feel as if this were them on stage. Straight into the opening of Standin’ in the Rain, I was transported back to 1978 and listening to side three of Out of the Blue on vinyl. Then came hit after hit: Sweet Talkin’ Woman, Turn to Stone, Shine a Little Love, Hold on Tight, Horace Wimp, Telephone Line, and many, many more. I was hooked, as were the rest of the audience in this wonderful experience of time-travel. We even had an appearance of one the earliest ELO hits in 10538 Overture … brilliant.

ELO Encounter—The Crescent Theatre Birmingham—16 September 2022

The band is led by Jack Rownes on keyboards and vocals, taking the Jeff Lynne role with a delivery so like the man himself, close your eyes and it’s real. Then you have younger brother, Harry Rownes on Bass, but also supporting vocals, as do the entire band. However, Harry has the added task of replicating the awesome (and too soon departed) voice of Kelly Groucutt, particularly on Rockaria! Lead guitars are provided by Martin Donald with Dacre Peck on drums. On Violin we had Jasmine Ali who also delivered lead vocals on Xanadu, one the best numbers of the night. Rounding off the band was newest member on acoustic guitars, Karl Younger.

The show was split into two sets ending with an encore of ELO’s biggest hit, Mr Blue Sky. By now, everyone was long on their feet and ELO Encounter departed to a massive flow of applause. It was nice to see some of the band in the foyer afterwards to thank the audience. A nice touch and familiarity which goes down well.

ELO Encounter are touring the UK throughout the remainder of 2022 and all next year. There are alternative tributes to ELO, but these have my recommendation. Look no further if you’re thinking of seeing one. 

ELO Encounter—The Crescent Theatre Birmingham—16 September 2022

Cheers.

Antony N Britt 

The biggest surprise on seeing Beautiful is just how many Carole King songs you know. Sure, I’d heard of Tapestry, and It’s Too Late, You’ve Got a Friend and Beautiful itself, and I also knew she was one half of the iconic writing duo of Goffin and King. But what I didn’t count on was hearing classics from The Shirelle’s, The Drifter’s, Bobby Vee and Little Eva, then realising who wrote the songs in the first place. To be honest, as well as being an excellent show, it was an education.

Beautiful: The Carole King Musical — Birmingham Hippodrome — 30 August 2022

From humble beginnings, King (with Goffin lyrics) wrote for the best. The show is based predominantly in the recording studios within an almost claustrophobic set which works well. There is also no intent on hiding rear and side stages with performers often seen moving with props and scenery. This too is effective as along with the enclosed studios, it gives the feel of a busy environment outside. Then, with all the music played onstage by the performers themselves, you really do feel you are in the studio as history was made.

Beautiful is a Jukebox Musical and that description is perfect because it is like hit after hit on the jukebox, with a story added for good measure. It Might as Well Rain Until September, Some Kind of Wonderful, Take Good Care of My Baby, Will You Love Me Tomorrow, The Locomotion, One Fine Day, and Chains (Made more famous by the Beatles). All of these were showcased in Beautiful.

Beautiful: The Carole King Musical — Birmingham Hippodrome — 30 August 2022

Music aside, what Beautiful also offered was a well-written script from Douglas McGrath which moved at a good pace. Obviously, words and music to most songs came from King and Goffin, but there were also numbers from contemporary composers, Cynthia Weil and Barry Mann, who featured heavily as a side plot. And the education was there as well as I did not know much about them, but they also delivered fine songs, notably You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feeling, We Gotta Get Out of This Place and On Broadway.

All the performers were outstanding, including Molly-Grace Cutler (Carole King), Tom Milner (Gerry Goffin), Seren Sandham-Davies (Cynthia Weil), Jos Slovick (Barry Mann), Claire Greenway (Genie), Sorrel Jordan (Betty) and Garry Robson (Donnie Kirsner).

The director for Beautiful was Nikolai Foster with Choreography by Leah Hill and Musical Direction from Sarah Travis.

After the breakup of King’s marriage to Gerry Goffin, she embarked on a new career as a performer in her own right and (as depicted in the show) the rest is history. Such an impact this show made on me, I immediately went out and ordered Tapestry (as I did not have it in my music library.

Beautiful is still currently touring the UK until the end of November. I recommend it highly.

Beautiful: The Carole King Musical — Birmingham Hippodrome — 30 August 2022

Cheers.

Antony N Britt

And another one bites the dust.

Well, at least another musical off the tick list. I’m a massive fan of Queen, and a musical theatre fan, but I’d never seen We Will Rock You until this showing. Okay, I was supposed to see it two years ago, then Covid came calling. Finally, though, I got to experience what it’s all about.

We Will Rock You — Birmingham Hippodrome — 11 July 2022

I have never witnessed a show like We Will Rock You before. Or rather, never been faced with two extremes. On one hand, the cast and band with their musical performances were outstanding. As good as anything I have ever seen or heard. Then on the other, you have the book by Ben Elton. I can honestly say, it is awful. I’d compare it to a low-grade GCSE project, but that would be unfair to the students. Little or no plot, terrible script, and contrived that many lines are only there as an excuse to wring out another Queen number. Many of the songs are irrelevant to the plot as well: Crazy Little Thing Called Love, Flash, The Show Must Go On and Fat Bottomed Girls. All fillers which do not move the (tenuous at best) story along. Not only that, many are not even great Queen songs. No One But You (Only the Good Die Young), These are the Days of Our Lives and Radio Ga Ga are average at best. Even the title number, We Will Rock You, is vastly inferior to the fast live version from Queen gigs of old. At least we got a cameo of that in the bows.

And then there were the characters as written. Little to them and only made good by the excellence of those in the roles. We are introduced to Meat and Brit, whose characters are built up to be major influences on developments, then both are discarded, having served their purpose.

The dialogue was filled with song puns, like “I’ll tell you what I want, what I really, really, want,” then “I can’t get no satisfaction,” and the comment that the truth is “Blowin’ in the wind.” One or two maybe, but when you’re on the 30th pun, you want to scream. And that was just Act One. Similarly, did we really need four Covid references? Less is good; no chance of overkill. But you didn’t need to kill Ben Elton’s script as it was dead already in an act of suicide by the writer.

We Will Rock You — Birmingham Hippodrome — 11 July 2022

But I still enjoyed the show. Well, mostly. This was because, as I have mentioned, the cast were phenomenal. I can’t give them enough praise. In the role of Galileo was Ian McIntosh who was out of this world. I Want to Break Free, in particular. Similarly, Elena Skye gave one of the best vocal performances I have ever seen. Let’s face it, unless you can deliver with power, sass, and stage presence, don’t even try to sing Somebody to Love. Skye was brilliant. Best number of the night.

Michael McKell played Cliff and he gave a good rendition of These Are the Days of Our Lives. Likewise, Martina Ciabatti Mennel (Meat) and Edward Leigh (Brit) were on top of their game, the former, excellent in No One But You (Only the Good Die Young) and together with I Want it All.

The villains of the piece were Jennifer O’Leary (Killer Queen) and Adam Strong (Khashoggi). Both were superb. O’Leary with Don’t Stop Me Now and Strong giving us Seven Seas of Rhye, plus together on A Kind of Magic.

And I must mention the band: Zachary Fils, Matt Herbert, James Barber, Simon Croft, Neil Murray, and  Dave Cottrell. All delivered a sound of pure rock genius and it was wonderful to see them invited into the bows and take front stage at the end.

So, a standing ovation for the performances, they were excellent. Shame about the script, though. It says it all when there are only seven named principals in a show and half of them only used when needed. Ben Elton — Could have done a whole lot better. Perhaps he was Under Pressure when he wrote this book.

What! Bad pun? Jeez, it must be catching.

Cheers.

We Will Rock You — Birmingham Hippodrome — 11 July 2022

Antony N Britt 

“Rama lama lama, ka dinga da dinga dong.” 

At least that’s what I think the lyrics are. I performed We Go Together in panto and I don’t think I ever got the words right. 

Grease—Highbury Theatre Sutton Coldfield —8 July 2022

At short notice, I went to see Grease (School Edition) by Script Youth Musical Theatre Company, and I was so glad I did. Always a supporter of local companies and youth theatre and from the moment the show began, I knew I was going to enjoy the evening.

I’m not going to go over the plot of Grease (Book, Music and Lyrics by Jim Jacobs and Warren Casey) and this was the first time I have seen a junior edition of any show. Shorter and more suitable for younger cast members, this edition keeps the fun and spirit of the original version. To be honest, I’ve only seen Grease once before and apart from the removal of the pregnancy plot and alternative version of Look at Me, I’m Sandra Dee, I didn’t notice many more differences. I’m sure there were but the fact I was so immersed in the show is a credit to a wonderful performance by all on stage.

In the role of Sandy was Erin Mooney who was superb in her headline number (and my favourite Grease song), Hopelessly Devoted to You. Likewise, Ollie Roberts as Danny channelled his best Travolta with Sandy, and both captured their roles perfectly.

Unless living on a deserted island for the last 50 years, everyone has heard of You’re the One That I Want, Summer Nights and Greased Lightening, but there are many more feelgood songs in this show. One not just for principals, but a large ensemble as well of which there was plenty of talent. Shakin’ at the High School Hop, Born to Hand Jive, Mooning and Freddy My Love are all good numbers and certainly had the audience full of applause after each.

Grease—Highbury Theatre Sutton Coldfield —8 July 2022

In addition to the main two, Grease is full of excellent supporting characters and to be successful you need the right people in the roles. Now when I watch a youth production, one person often registers with me more than others and on this occasion, it was Evie Rice as Rizzo. Yes, it’s an iconic role but you need excellence to fulfil its potential. Evie was in character right from the go, full of sass and attitude, facial expressions, and reactions consistent throughout. Evie tells in her programme biography that Rizzo is a “Strong character, so unlike herself,” which made the performance even more remarkable. And superb in There are Worse Things I Could Do. Well done.

Another great moment was Beauty School Dropout with Finlay Laidlaw doubling as Teen Angel alongside his T-Bird, Doody. It is one of my guilty pleasures, partaking in OTT performances and Finlay was on top of his game in this number; the audience showing its love and appreciation as deserved.

Grease is a great show by the fact there are plenty of principal roles in which to shine. Harry Robbins (Kenickie), Aimie Whillis (Frenchy), Josef Hammond (Sonny), Reanne Witheridge (Marty), Zachariah Scrivens (Roger) and Bethany Sall (Jan) all gave so much.

And there were a further 23 on stage in terms of excellent dancers and ensemble. Amature Theatre is for everyone with each as important as the lead. This is a nice company which showed enthusiasm throughout, the reaction to the deserved applause appreciated. Script Youth is also managed well. I felt welcomed on arrival and throughout the experience.

In charge of Production and Choreography was Louise Farmer who can be immensely proud of her cast and crew. Assisting, though, on Choreography was youth member, Molly Chamberlain, who also figured in a principal role as Patty the Cheerleader. Musical Direction was in safe hands with stalwart of Midlands Theatre, Chris Corcoran overseeing an excellent band.

A Lovely, enjoyable evening out and I look forward to more from Script Youth Musical Theatre Company. They prove youth and theatre do go together.

With a “Shoo-bop sha wadda wadda, yippity boom de boom.” 

Grease—Highbury Theatre Sutton Coldfield —8 July 2022

Cheers.

Antony N Britt

*** Apologies for the lateness of this review. Covid came calling. *** 

It’s hard to describe Billie Eilish’s musical style: Ethereal, gothic, pop, dark pop. I can’t label it, and I don’t think you should. If anything, the correct term would be unique.

Billie Eilish

I came across Billie in 2019 after hearing a recommendation from Dave Grohl, and who was I to question the judgement of a rock god. So, I purchased the Don’t Smile at Me EP (All but an album itself) and after an eager wait, the first full release; When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go? And I secured tickets for her first arena tour. Brilliant. Then Covid came cancelling and a huge wait. Since then, a Bond theme (and an Oscar), plus a further album, Happier Than Ever, has established the still 20-year-old as one of the biggest acts on the planet so when tickets went on sale again for 2022, I was first in the queue.

The set was simple. Huge stage with just brother/song writing partner, Finneas O’Connell, plus drummer, Andrew Marshall present; it gave more focus to the star of the show. There were some backing track vocals, but this was always going to be the case as many of Eilish’s songs are double tracked and more. But the main force was live to profound effect.

Kicking off with an explosive entrance, we had Bury a Friend, followed by I Didn’t Change My Number and immediately, the audience were captive of the magic and energy Billie Eilish releases. Everyone lapped it up, including me. You could call it hypnotism at times. It was how I like to enjoy gigs, immersed and totally lost in the experience.

Billie Eilish—Utilita Areana Birmingham—15 June 2022 © Antony N Britt 2022

There are so many good numbers: You Should See Me in a Crown, My Strange Addiction, When the Party’s Over, NDA, Oxytocin, and not forgetting cameos of older hits like Bellyache and Ocean Eyes. A history of dancing injuries and sporting kinesiology tape, this didn’t stop Eilish giving a massive energetic performance which she seemed to enjoy as much as the audience. Billie Eilish is refreshing. There are no airs and graces, she is not full of herself, and clearly takes no shit, often concerned for people struggling in the crush of an audience.

Billie Eilish—Utilita Areana Birmingham—15 June 2022 © Antony N Britt 2022

My top numbers of the night were Getting Older, Bad Guy, and especially the finale of Happier Than Ever, a song which is my current favourite tune of the moment. And there were others that I found a love for which I hadn’t thought of before. In this case, Lost Cause, which I cannot stop singing now.

Billie Eilish—Utilita Areana Birmingham—15 June 2022 © Antony N Britt 2022

It’s easy to see why Eilish is so popular with both audiences and peers. There is an honesty and stripped-back approach to the music that makes it pure. And there is something in the lyrics which not only resonate with the young, but also oldies like me. It was also wonderful to relive the experience with an identical set broadcast on TV from Glastonbury a week later. I was still buzzing, and it took me back to that wonderful night.

One of the best gigs I have ever been to. Here’s to many more. 

Cheers.

Antony N Britt 

***Apologies for the lateness of this review. Covid came calling.***

Some films don’t transfer well to stage, and Shrek is one of them. Don’t get me wrong, it’s an okay, enjoyable romp, but not one of the best scripts with a mediocre score. And that was such a pity because Quarry Bank Musical Theatre Company are one of the best I have seen on my travels. But you can only work with what material you have and fortunately, QBMTC did pull off a storm of a show, bringing alive characters far beyond what the script expects to deliver. 

Shrek—Brierley Hill Civic Hall—June 7 2022

Based on the 2001 film of the same name, Shrek the Musical follows the plot closely, with some added extras, most notably expanding on Lord Farquaad’s plot, excellently portrayed by Tom Robinson. But he wasn’t the only one to shine. Carl Cook in the lead role was as good as Mike Myers and likewise, Sarah Coussens excelled too as Princess Fiona. Completing the trio of heroes, one actor had the unenviable task of being an Eddie Murphey. Fortunately, Luey Pearce made Donkey his own and had me forgetting the Hollywood stars’ performance completely. Other principals were Natalie Baggott (Dragon), Gillian Homer (Gingerbread Man/Sugar Plum Fairy) and Isabella Cook (Pinocchio). 

It is a credit to Quarry Bank and amateur theatre that the performances were that good, it put the West End in the shade. Sometimes with professionals, you get the feel of going through the motions yet here, professionalism came from the heart of those who do it for the love of theatre. And didn’t it show. Wonderful. 

Shrek—Brierley Hill Civic Hall—June 7 2022

Shrek has a few excellent numbers: Morning Person, Build a Wall, Freak Flag and Story of My Life. Additionally, I loved What’s Up Duloc with the wonderful Duloc Performers. But my favourite number of the night was I Know It’s Today, where three Princess Fiona’s at different ages, tell of their wish to be rescued. Credit to Connie Davies and Katie Tranter who joined Sarah Coussens in this wonderful offering. However, there were a few songs which were fillers, not adding to the plot or moving it forward. Again, a fault of the original template. 

And I hate to keep going back to the script, but it amazes me how fast things date. Only 20 years since the original film debuted, I now feel uncomfortable at the ridiculing of a person’s size with Lord Farquaad’s being used as a plot device for cheap laughs.  

The team behind Shrek, making this an enjoyable night for all, was Zoe Russell with dual duties of Directing and Choreography, while Chris Handley was Musical Director. 

Brierley Hill Civic Hall isn’t the best venue for Musical Theatre, echoing like a cavern at times but Quarry Bank raised the roof with exuberance and quality throughout. A wonderful showing from an excellent musical theatre company. 

Shrek—Brierley Hill Civic Hall—June 7 2022

Cheers.

Antony N Britt 

The Wedding Singer was never a classic movie in 1998, and the stage musical isn’t a classic either, but if you want harmless feelgood fun, this is a show for you. For what Wedding Singer lacks in depth of plot and music, it gives in escapism and nostalgia. But you still need to make the best of what you have and fortunately, Bournville Musical Theatre Company did just that.

The Wedding Singer – The Crescent Theatre, Birmingham – 21 May 2022

The show tells the story of Robbie Hart, played superbly by Stuart McDiarmid, who gets jilted at his own wedding and falls in love with waitress, Julia Sullivan (the excellent Chloe Turner). However, Julia is engaged to rich businessman, Glen (Liam Mc Nally) whose example in life Robbie tries to follow. That is until he realises happiness is better than being rich. A sound philosophy.

But a production is not just about the main roles (as original Robbie in the film, Adam Sandler, often seems to forget) You need a strong cast, plus good characters, and meaningful sub-plots. Thankfully, there were; one such stand-out performance being that of Lisa Colvin-Grieve in the role of Holly. Great character and best number of the show with Lewis Doley (Sammy) in Right in Front of Your Eyes. Doley was also excellent as one half of the comic duo of bandmates with Robbie Love as George.

There were also good showings from Jill Hughes (Robbie’s Gran, Rosie) and Sarah Frances McCarthy (Julia’s Mum, Angie). One more to note was new member to the company, Harriet Marsland, who was exceptionally strong in her number, Let Me Come Home.

As well as the rousing opening number, It’s Your Wedding Day, there were decent tunes in Someday, Somebody Kill Me, Saturday Night in the City, All About the Green and Grow Old With You.

The Wedding Singer – The Crescent Theatre, Birmingham – 21 May 2022

The show was directed by John Morrison with Rhian Clements and musical direction was in the safe hands of Chris Corcoran. Choreography was arranged superbly by Sadie Turner who also seemed to have made an unplanned excursion on stage, as she was in the programme stating, “She was looking forward to watching the show.”

First scheduled two years ago and like many, hit by Covid. The Wedding Singer also marked Bournville’s 100th Anniversary as a company. There will be a Centenary Concert at The Crescent Theatre, Birmingham on October 22 this year to celebrate this. An amazing feat to reach such a landmark. Here’s to the next 100 years.

The Wedding Singer – The Crescent Theatre, Birmingham – 21 May 2022

Cheers.

Antony N Britt

I’ve begun many recent reviews with comments about how hard it’s been during the numerous lockdowns for Performing Arts, and now it is the time for Dance Schools to have their say. Almost two years to the day that everyone was ordered to close their doors, Keeling School of Dance took to the stage with the aptly named, The Show Must Go On.

Keeling School of Dance was established in 1934 by Beatrice Keeling at the age of 14, operating from her parents’ house before continuing in the area, finally moving to Aldridge in 1976. Sadly, Miss Keeling passed away in 2014, having taught until 2012. It is good, though, that the school has continued, run by former pupils: Jane Eardley, Sarah Beckett, Elaine Wigfield and Clare Cooksey. Classes begin from age 2 right up to advanced level and adult beginners. Also on the teaching staff is former pupil, Fran Eardley, who performed widely in the show including Point Solo (Arabian Dance) and Lyrical Solo (You Will Be Found). And it’s great to see the more experienced pupils moving forward. Grace Chambers (Jazz Solo {Show Me How You Burlesque}) and Niamh Reynolds (Contemporary Solo {Godmanchester Chinese Bridge}) now teach the younger pupils while Natasha Evans (Contemporary Solo {Showstoppa}) oversees Street.

I last attended a Keeling showcase in 2019 and the positive progression of pupils was staggering to see. Several who were tots, some whom I’d worked with in Theatre before that time, were displaying quality and polished skills. How quickly three years have flown, but so much hard work has obviously happened during that time.

On show were examples from all classes Keeling provide: Ballet, Tap, Theatre Craft, Gym, Street, Contemporary, Jazz, Lyrical and Broadway. Yes, the little ones pulled the heartstrings in their Olaf costumes during When I Get Older, but it was the overall enthusiasm and determination to get everything right during all the dances which was the overriding memory of an emotional and exhilarating afternoon. In addition to the solos already mentioned, there was also Sax, an excellent tap solo from Nadia Fallouh. I cannot name everyone, the same I won’t single out more dances as this would be an overly long review and to be frank, I’d have to list them all.

There were two awards presented on the day. The Cooper Cup for progress was won by the previously mentioned Grace Chambers while the Keeling Cup for enthusiasm, commitment and improvement went jointly to siblings, Lizzie Powell-Heyworth and James Powell-Heyworth.

Grace Chambers, winner of the Cooper Cup with mum, Elaine Wigfield.
James & Lizzie Powell-Heyworth with the Keeling Cup.

This show wasn’t a vanity project for parents to see how good their kids were in a chosen field of the arts, it was to engage with the wider world and show that dance is an important part of culture and should not be ignored. Covid restrictions hit the arts badly and to bounce back fighting is a credit to the staff and pupils of Keeling. The students of today are stars of tomorrow and there were plenty on view during this showing.

Cheers.

Antony N Britt

Somebody once said to me that there were better Queen tribute bands out there than Queen & Adam Lambert. Now, I rarely do tribute acts, apart from when you can no longer see the real thing like Queen. So, how did Supreme Queen measure up to the dazzling legacy and did it beat the modern-day incarnation of the band?

Well, visually, it took time because obviously, they were not Queen, but the sound! With a voice so like Freddy Mercury, lead singer, Scott Maley immediately had me believing I was listening to the real thing. And that, I guess, is what you need with tributes. For tributes are what they are and to be successful you do need to believe. After a few songs, I forgot the physical differences and I experienced legends of rock.

Starting off with One Vision and Tie Your Mother Down, Supreme Queen treated a packed audience to hit after hit: Seven Seas of Rhye, Keep Yourself Alive, It’s a Kind of Magic and Under Pressure were among 25 instantly recognisable classics. I was also overjoyed to hear the fast (and, superior) version of We Will Rock You.

The set in the main modelled itself on the stadium tour songs of the mid-1980s. I guess when you have such an enormous catalogue, things must give way. Therefore, sparse on the early albums and nothing from the final three. A shame, but it’s probably what the fans want. And to be there, the audience most definitely were fans of Queen. Such energy and enthusiasm from Supreme Queen transferred onto those watching. And not just the oldies who formed the majority. It was also good to see younger members; teenagers with parents next to me and three children all under eleven in front with their family. It was clear all were brought up on the band, gloriously indoctrinated and now having the time of their lives. Brilliant. You see, we form many of our tastes based on those of others. I, myself, was into Queen aged 10, all because my elder sister had Queen albums in 1973 while my classmates went on to like The Bay City Rollers, .

The show divided into two sets, allowing audience and band time to recuperate and then we had more of the same: I Want to Break Free, Another One Bites the Dust, Radio Ga Ga and, of course, Bohemian Rhapsody. Mimicking Queen shows of old, Supreme Queen ended with We Will Rock You (single version) and We Are the Champions.

What we also had were two long drum and guitar solos. Now, I’m not a fan of Brian May and Roger Taylor’s musical masturbations, but they were mainstays of the original shows throughout Queen’s career, so I can see why they’re included.

Supporting Scott Maley’s Mercury was Luke Timmins (Brian May), Alan Wallbanks (John Deacon) and Allan Brown (Roger Taylor). In addition, we had Ben Marshall as the keyboard player Queen didn’t have but contributing the pieces Freddy Mercury would play. All were excellent. Let’s face it, to pull off being convincing Queens, you’ve got to be damn good at what you do, and Supreme Queen were that and more.

A thoroughly wonderful night. I will be back. Long live Queen.

Cheers.

Antony N Britt

Tom Bryce finds a USB stick on a train and brings it home to try and find its owner to return it. However, on viewing, he witnesses the murder of a young woman in an online snuff video. Tom is then threatened by the perpetrators to keep silent otherwise it will be bad for him, wife, Kellie and son, Max. However, Max fails to do so and Kellie is taken to be the next star performer.

I’m a huge fan of Peter James, although I only started reading him with the Roy Grace novels. I guess that makes Looking Good Dead the second book of James’ that I read many years ago. I’ve since read them all and am now going through the standalones’ back catalogue.

Looking Good Dead, like many stage productions, had a small cast so roles from the book were reassigned. In fact, Grace wasn’t the main character on this occasion, the Bryce family instead receiving the focus. However, it was nice for a fan to hear references to off-stage police persons like Norman Potting, Cleo Moray, EJ Bountwood and Alison Vosper, among others. It brought a bit more of the books to proceedings.

In the roles of Tom and Kellie Bryce we had Adam Woodyatt and Laurie Brett duplicating their Eastenders soap marriage and the chemistry between them was obvious. Woodyatt had been in Eastenders for 35 years until recently and although Tom was similar in character to Ian Beale, he was different enough to be a person in his own right. Both Woodyatt and Brett delivered strong, believable performances on the night and the same can be said for Luke-Ward Wilkinson as Max. There were some lovely scenes which portrayed the typical lack of communication between parent and offspring.

On the police side were Harry Long as Roy Grace with Leon Stewart in the role of Glenn Branson. Completing the trio of detectives was Gemma Stroyan as one of my favourite Grace characters – Bella Moy. However, I didn’t see any Maltesers on this occasion (You need to read the books to get that one). Supporting, also was Ian Houghton (Jonas Kent), Mylo McDonald (Mick) and Natalie Boakye (Janie).

Looking Good Dead looked good indeed with a main set of the Bryce’s living room with occasional illuminated cellar backdrop behind a gauze and pop-up police station. Transition between scenes were smooth and you did have the feel of everything being bigger than it was.

It was probably good that it has been 15 years since I read the novel as I couldn’t remember many details. I’m now intrigued to learn the differences but will wait for the ITV adaptation as this tale is next in line to air, then I may re-read the book. I’m pretty sure, though, the brains behind the kidnapping differed in the book.

Looking Good Dead was adapted for stage by Shaun McKenna and directed by Jonathan O’Boyle with Joshua Andrews as Producer.

Overall, an enjoyable evening and I look forward to further theatre outings for Roy Grace and Co.

Cheers.

Antony N Britt

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