Tag Archive: New Alexander


Tom Bryce finds a USB stick on a train and brings it home to try and find its owner to return it. However, on viewing, he witnesses the murder of a young woman in an online snuff video. Tom is then threatened by the perpetrators to keep silent otherwise it will be bad for him, wife, Kellie and son, Max. However, Max fails to do so and Kellie is taken to be the next star performer.

I’m a huge fan of Peter James, although I only started reading him with the Roy Grace novels. I guess that makes Looking Good Dead the second book of James’ that I read many years ago. I’ve since read them all and am now going through the standalones’ back catalogue.

Looking Good Dead, like many stage productions, had a small cast so roles from the book were reassigned. In fact, Grace wasn’t the main character on this occasion, the Bryce family instead receiving the focus. However, it was nice for a fan to hear references to off-stage police persons like Norman Potting, Cleo Moray, EJ Bountwood and Alison Vosper, among others. It brought a bit more of the books to proceedings.

In the roles of Tom and Kellie Bryce we had Adam Woodyatt and Laurie Brett duplicating their Eastenders soap marriage and the chemistry between them was obvious. Woodyatt had been in Eastenders for 35 years until recently and although Tom was similar in character to Ian Beale, he was different enough to be a person in his own right. Both Woodyatt and Brett delivered strong, believable performances on the night and the same can be said for Luke-Ward Wilkinson as Max. There were some lovely scenes which portrayed the typical lack of communication between parent and offspring.

On the police side were Harry Long as Roy Grace with Leon Stewart in the role of Glenn Branson. Completing the trio of detectives was Gemma Stroyan as one of my favourite Grace characters – Bella Moy. However, I didn’t see any Maltesers on this occasion (You need to read the books to get that one). Supporting, also was Ian Houghton (Jonas Kent), Mylo McDonald (Mick) and Natalie Boakye (Janie).

Looking Good Dead looked good indeed with a main set of the Bryce’s living room with occasional illuminated cellar backdrop behind a gauze and pop-up police station. Transition between scenes were smooth and you did have the feel of everything being bigger than it was.

It was probably good that it has been 15 years since I read the novel as I couldn’t remember many details. I’m now intrigued to learn the differences but will wait for the ITV adaptation as this tale is next in line to air, then I may re-read the book. I’m pretty sure, though, the brains behind the kidnapping differed in the book.

Looking Good Dead was adapted for stage by Shaun McKenna and directed by Jonathan O’Boyle with Joshua Andrews as Producer.

Overall, an enjoyable evening and I look forward to further theatre outings for Roy Grace and Co.

Cheers.

Antony N Britt

Failing guitarist, Dewey Finn, takes a job under false pretenses in an exclusive and expensive private school. He then teaches his class to play rock music and forms a band with them to win a prestigious competition.

Yes, I love rock, and I love musical theatre, therefore it is no surprise that I adore School of Rock. Closely based on the 2003 film of the same name, this is the best feelgood musical going these days. The notion that dreams come true, and you really can do anything if you try. It lifts the audience to their feet, and not just in the finale. With a cracking script from Julian Fellowes, lyrics courtesy of Glenn Slater and music by Andrew Lloyd Webber, you have the instant recipe for an outstanding show.

I first saw it in the West End but this UK tour for me was even better. Perhaps knowing the songs so well, I was singing and moving in my seat throughout. Also revelling in admiration for the kids who do play their own instruments. Such talent from all.

In the title role, and totally at home as the hapless Dewey Finn was Jake Sharp. Outstanding with the strongest of performances and excelling in all numbers. Alongside, playing school principal Rosalie Mullins was Rebecca Lock who delivered Where Did the Rock Go? and Queen of the Night in great fashion. Supporting well, though were James Bisp as the much put-upon Ned Schneebly with Amy Oxley portraying the domineering Patty.

And then there were the pupils of the School of Rock. What can I say? The twelve on show during this viewing were out of this world. Harry Churchill (Zack on Lead Guitar), Angus McDougal (Lawrence on Keys), Chloe Marler (Katie on Bass) and Eva McGrath (Freddy {Fredrica} on drums). I’ve only ever known Freddy as the male originally intended but Eva was brilliant as the student who struggled to achieve. I had great empathy for her.

Leading the vocal section was Angel Lucero as shy Tomika and she delivered a powerhouse of a performance in Teacher’s Pet supported well by Lily Rose Martin (Marcy) and Elisha Kerai (Shonelle).

As a huge fan of The Voice Kids, it was a surprise and joy to see 2019 finalist Keira Laver as school swot, Summer. And Keira was amazing leading the class during one of my favourite numbers, Time to Play. Completing the class of excellence were Riotafari Gardner (James – Security), Ava Masters (Sophie the roadie with the killer pigtails), Alex Shotton (Mason on Lights) and Logan Matthews (Billy the costume drama queen).

Credit is due to a fantastic production team including Laurence Connor (Director), Joann M. Hunter (Choreography) and Michael Riley (Musical Direction).

In addition to the songs already mentioned, there are others of top-drawer quality: When I Climb to the Top of Mount Rock, the beautiful If Only You Would Listen, You’re in the Band and the awesome Stick it to the Man.

I have favourites in musical theatre which change constantly. I can honestly say, though, leaving The New Alexander, I have never enjoyed myself in a theatre as much as I did on this occasion. Buzzing madly and still on a high days later. School of Rock is touring the UK until the end of summer and if you only go and see one musical in 2022, make it The School of Rock.

Cheers.

Antony N Britt

Due to a ridiculous schedule with my own production and other commitments these past few months, I’m way behind on publishing reviews, so sorry about that.

*****

I admit from past experiences I’m not a fan of Bill Kenwright Productions, so I approached Heathers with a tinge of worry amid the excitement. You see, I had not seen the show before, yet was familiar with the music due to both Off Broadway and West End Original Cast Recordings. I also had good memories of the 1988 Daniel Waters film of the same name which (incidentally) this musical follows closely.

Heathers tells of Veronica Sawyer, an unfashionable High School student, desperate to belong to the major clique, all named Heather. After initial success, Veronica falls foul of leader, Heather Chandler and turns to new student and bad boy, Jason Dean (JD). What follows is a tale of murder, revenge and suicide. But however dark the themes may sound, there is a glorious wealth of humour throughout.

What makes Heathers work is an excellent book with a top-drawer selection of songs from Kevin Murphey and Laurence O’Keefe. All are memorable; not a weak tune among them. Still, to bring such a good template to life, you need the cast, and all on show were amazing.

I must say, I loved every bit of Rebecca Wickes’ performance; be it song or character; her mannerisms were so believable. She was outstanding as anti-heroine, Veronica, with numbers: Beautiful, Dead Girl Walking and I Say No, out of this world. Equally so was Simon Gordon in the role of JD who duetted exceptionally with Wickes in Seventeen and Our Love is God, as well as his own Freeze Your Brain.

“And then there’s the Heathers. They float above it all.”

On my viewing, the Heathers were Daisy Twells (Chandler), Merryl Ansah (Duke) and Lizzy Parker (McNamara). These three absolutely smashed it as the terrible trio, especially during the popular Candy Store. Individually and respectively, The Me Inside of Me, Never Shut Up Again and Lifeboat again exceeded expectations.

Supporting, we had Liam Doyle (Kurt) and Rory Phelan (Ram) as the expertly portrayed dense High School Jocks, lured to their deaths by JD. Also on show were Bailey Hart (Ms Fleming) singing Shine a Light, Mhairi Angus (Martha) with Kindergarten Boyfriend, plus Andy Brady and Kurt Kansley as Ram and Kurt’s fathers.

This tour production was directed by Andy Frickman with choreography from Gary Lloyd. Musical direction was in the hands of Gary Hickerson.

Heathers is a brilliant show, a real rollercoaster ride which flows at an amazing speed without a dull moment in sight. The tour has now ended but I urge you to check it out either back in the West End or the next available tour. This time, Bill Kenwright Productions left me satisfied and wanting more.

Cheers.

Antony N Britt

Before going to see 9 to 5, I only knew three things about the show: Two songs and the fact it’s famous for Country and Western songwriter, Dolly Parton. And as the show kicks off, we get to see two of those with a video intro from Dolly before launching the title song, 9 to 5. A nice touch, but not needed as the cast straight from the start have the audience’s full attention with excellent song and dance, full of energy and perfected skill.

I had a special interest in this show, however, as Here for You was one of the first numbers I ever sang solo in my own stage exploits during a concert. Sitting centre of the stalls on row B, I got almost as good a view of Doralee (Ahem!) as when I was on stage.

Now, twenty minutes into the show and with both songs I was familiar with having already gone, I wondered if it had peaked for me. Not a chance. It does always help if I know songs, but such was the calibre of delivery, it didn’t matter. Around Here, Backwoods Barbie, Heart to Hart, Change It and Shine Like the Sun were all amazing. Great vocals with equally matching choreography.

Set in the 1980s, 9 to 5 is the tale of three women fighting their boss for equality, and leading the pack, former Eternal star, Louise Redknapp was outstanding as Violet. Then we had Amber Davies playing Judy and I have to say, what a shining performance, especially during Get Out and Stay Out. But how can anyone fit into the heels of Dolly Parton? Well, Georgina Castle did, and Dolly would be proud. The trio really worked well together and looked a close-knit team

Supporting well, though were Lucinda Lawrence as the devoted assistant, Roz, to the sexist Franklin Hart Jnr (Sean Needham). And we also had Christopher Jordan Marshall (Joe), Jemima Loddy (Missy), and finally, Laura Tyrer as the gloriously alcoholic Margaret.

9 to 5 is simply a fantastic feelgood show, full of laughs included in a good script from Patricia Resnik. But credit to the production on this tour who made the whole experience unforgettable. Jeff Calhoun (Director), Lisa Stevens (Choreographer) and Mark Crossland (Musical Director) led a great team.

A good indicator of how much I enjoy a show is if I immediately purchase an original cast recording. And I have (Well, streamed it, at least). This is a show not just for fans of Dolly Parton, but everyone. One of the best I’ve seen and appreciated by the entire audience on my visit.

Cheers.

Antony N Britt.

I see many amateur productions throughout the year and decided it was time to experience BMOS Musical Theatre Company in action. Therefore, following reading about last years’ award-winning Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, I had no hesitation going. Of course, musical societies differ in terms of profile, budget, size and location, so the smaller can never compete with one who can hire the New Alexander Theatre. Therefore, BMOS must deliver and I’m pleased to say they did just that. What a marvellous, professional company. Amateur in name but nothing of the sort in terms of evidence on stage.

Half a Sixpence is the tale of Arthur Kipps, a shop assistant who comes into an inheritance which leads him to a choice of love for Ann, or the more socially acceptable, Helen. To be honest, I found the plot rather pedestrian with some superficial characters who are redundant at times, and the occasional song lacking that extra something. But then I remembered this was not the more recent Cameron Mackintosh revival, but the 2008 Warner Brown version. It didn’t matter. BMOS managed to drag the mediocre up to the higher echelons of musical theatre with quality of cast and production throughout.

In the lead role of Kipps was Daniel Parker, and what a pro. Magnificent from start to finish, particularly in numbers such as My Heart’s Out There and Half a Sixpence. Equally supporting with excellence was Annabel Pilcher as Ann who was outstanding with I Know What I Am.

There was also a fantastic performance from Jake Genders in the part of Harry Chitterlow, a strange character who seems to serve no purpose other than being the solution to Kipps’ problems at the end. Could do with a deserving subplot, especially in this production as Genders was amazing.

Rounding off the principals were great displays from Carys Wilson (Helen), Jo Smith (Mrs Walsingham) and Lee Navin (Walsingham). Supporting these in marvelous fashion we had the shop staff in Alex Nicholls (Pearce), Neil Ward (Sid), Andrew Treacy (Buggins), Morgan Bebbington (Kate), Rosie Harvey (Flo), Charlotte Boyer (Victoria) and Patrick Pryce (Shalford). Other named parts included: Lucy Homer (Laura), Adam Wheeler (Deckchair Attendant & Mayor), Keir Poutney (Photographer & Dog Model Maker), Sian Patterson (Gwendoline), Aaron Hollyoak (Young Kipps) and Sophia Patel (Young Ann). The two younger versions were also played by Harry George and Olivia Brookes for half of the run.

At the helm in production was Stephen Duckham (Director), David Easto (Musical Director) and Suzi Budd (Choreographer).

Half a Sixpence is a great show for the chorus and there was plenty on view, full of energy which travelled through to the audience, especially in Flash, Bang Wallop! BMOS return to the Alexander Theatre in November with A Christmas Carol and on the evidence of Half a Sixpence, it will be well worth a visit.

Cheers.

Antony N Britt

I first saw Avenue Q years ago, therefore when I heard of a touring production coming to my area, I had no hesitation taking a second helping.

Avenue Q – New Alexandra Theatre, Birmingham – 16 February 2019

Avenue Q is Sesame Street grown up – and totally corrupted. Simple, but it works, and there are numerous messages in the show which we may not wish to admit to – but are oh so true. With a book by Jeff Whitty, plus music and lyrics from Robert Lopez and Jeff Mark, Avenue Q has been entertaining audiences for years, and this packed New Alexander Theatre experience was no exception.

For those not acquainted, Avenue Q features puppet characters alongside three humans, interacting with each other. The puppets are animated and voiced by actors, who although unconcealed onstage, are completely ignored by both human and puppet characters. All puppeteers wear black to minimise distraction as opposed to the colourful clothing of the humans. This works and you soon focus on the puppets as though they were real.

The script to Avenue Q is funny, well-written and backed by an excellent selection of songs. These include Sucks to Be Me, If You Were Gay, There is Life Outside Your Apartment, I Wish I Could Go Back to College and For Now. But I also have special favourites. Everyone’s a Little Bit Racist totally speaks the truth while There’s a Fine, Fine Line would be at home in any musical. Also, The Internet is For Porn, which will bring the house down every time. “Me up all night honking me horn to porn, porn, porn.” Oh yes!

Then we come to the scenes. No matter how many times I see it, I will never be ambivalent towards puppet sex. And the dream sequence … “I know, put my earmuffs on the cookie.” But we also have the closet gay (Rod) singing My Girlfriend in Canada who “Comes from Vancouver and sucks like a Hoover.” The song then finishes with the words, “And I can’t wait to eat her pussy again.” I do have to admit, I’ve played around and used that line on many a musical theatre song at the end, just to hear how it sounds.

A great night with a brilliant cast led by the puppeteers: Lawrence Smith (Princetown/Rod), Cecily Redman (Kate Monster/Lucy the Slut), Tom Steedon (Nicky/Trekkie Monster/Bad Idea Bear), Megan Armstrong (Mrs Thistletwat/Bad Idea Bear/Second Arm), And then the humans: Saori Oda was brilliant as Christmas Eve as were Oliver Stanley (Brian) and Nicholas McClean (Gary Coleman). Yes … this is meant to be Gary Coleman from TV’s Different Strokes. Ensemble were: Jasmine Bell, Ellis Dackombe, Chloe Gentles and Robbie Noonan.

Directing and choreographing Avenue Q was Cressida Carre with musical direction from Dean McDermott.

If ever you get the chance, I would certainly recommend a trip down to Avenue Q. I guarantee you’ll enjoy being in the neighbourhood.


Avenue Q – New Alexandra Theatre, Birmingham – 16 February 2019

Cheers.

Antony N Britt.

A month ago I saw Legally Blonde at The Crescent Theatre, performed by the brilliant Bournville Musical Theatre Company. As I enjoyed that so much, I thought I’d take the opportunity of seeing the touring production at the New Alexander Theatre.

Legally Blonde – The New Alexander Theatre, Birmingham – 23 May 2018

Unlike last month, the opening was low-key, and the show took time to build the energy, perhaps needing some of that Red Bull Elle drinks in the show. I guess some of the atmosphere came from the fact this was a matinee with the auditorium barely a third full, which was a pity as it was a great show.

Legally Blonde is fast climbing the list of my top shows and this performance did nothing to harm that. In the role of Elle we had Rebecca Stenhouse, standing in due to the illness of Lucie Jones. Well, I never watch X-Factor or Eurovision, so had no knowledge of Lucie, and could therefore appreciate the characterisation with an open mind. And what a good portrayal she gave. Suited the role perfectly, giving a faultless showing with strong voice and acting.

Playing Paulette, the top billing went to former EastEnders actress. Rita Simons, who captured the role well, making Ireland one of the best numbers. I did think Paulette’s outfits weren’t oddball enough, but this did not detract from Rita’s performance. Also from the world of soaps we had Bill Ward, last seen plunging from a bridge in Emmerdale. He made the perfect Callaghan.

I have said the atmosphere grew throughout and the culmination of this was an energetic finale, complete with pink ticker-tape, much of which I found on me hours later. Best number of the day for me was Legally Blonde itself. However, Gay or European did not live up to my previous experiences. A slight downside also was that dialogue seemed a little rushed on occasions. Still, a show full of memorable numbers: Bend and Snap, What You Want, Positive, So Much Better and Take it Like a Man were all highlights of an enjoyable afternoon.

Also appearing were David Barrett (Emmett), Liam Doyle (Warner), Laura Harrison (Vivienne), Helen Petrova (Whitney/Brooke Wyndham), Ben Harlow (Kyle), Mark Peachey (Winthrop/Dewey), Alexandra Wright (Margot), Rachel Grundy (Serena), Delycia Belgrave (Pilar), Nancy Hill (Enid Hoops), Rosie Needham (Kate/Chutney), Michael Hamway (Aaron Shultz), Felipe Bejarano (Sundeep/Nikos), Lucyelle Cliffe (Judge/Pforzheiner/Store Manager), Sally Frith (Gaelen), Brett Shields (Grand Master Chad), Craig Tyler (Carlos) and Laura Mullowney (Swing).

Legally Blonde was directed and choreographed by Anthony Williams with co-choreography from Dean Street. The musical director was James McCullagh.

The second production of Legally Blonde I have experienced within a few weeks, and I would see a third if the chance came. A great show that I’d highly recommend if it comes your way.

Legally Blonde – The New Alexander Theatre, Birmingham – 23 May 2018

Cheers.

Antony N Britt

I have a confession. Up until now, I’d disliked West Side Story. And it isn’t that I’ve not given it a chance. I purchased two separate cast recordings recently, but didn’t rate either. Also, I saw the 1961 film starring Natalie Wood and Richard Beymer, and was bored by that too. However, I couldn’t totally write it off until I’d seen it in a theatre, so I took the opportunity with The New Alexander Theatre’s Stage Experience.

The Stage Experience offers just that to youngsters aged 9 to 24 where they get to put on a show to a paying audience, all in two weeks. Two weeks! Wow! Those on stage came from all backgrounds. There were many who’d been in productions before, those who attend performing arts schools and academies, plus some treading the boards for the first time in their lives.

West Side Story – New Alexander Theatre, Birmingham – 25 August 2017

And what a show they gave.

As I say, I’m not a fan of West Side and that’s due to the original template. I find much of Arthur Laurents’ script poor and dated. And … puerile lyrics in some of the Bernstein/Sondheim songs.

When you’re a Jet, you’re a Jet all the way,” and “We’re gonna hand ’em a surprise, tonight. We’re gonna cut ’em down to size, tonight. Sounds lame this day and age.

To be honest, the show could do with a new book, bringing a fresh approach. This may shock traditionalists, but everything needs a revamp now and then. A fault with the book was I found little empathy with the main characters. The Sharks and Jets, as written, are pretty much … nobheads. Also, I had little fondness for Maria who sleeps with Tony knowing he has just killed her brother. And the whole gang thing. Maria says her parents would not approve, yet are happy for their offspring to belong to violent gangs.

Maria, it was an accident,” Tony says about killing Bernardo. No it bloody wasn’t! You stabbed him four times – twice in the back. Cue the daggers from those seated around me. I really must learn to shut my mouth at times.

So, how were a bunch of youngsters going to turn me in the case of a show I’d decided I was probably going to hate? Answer – by giving a fantastic performance with much energy.

Stand out numbers for me were Maria, America, Somewhere and Tonight – Pt 1, all done with superb voices and a great band. However, it was also the dance routines which made the show a hit. With a huge cast and great choreography, numbers like Dance at the Gym and the ballet sequence were amazing.

The leads were great and superbly playing Tony was Elliot Gooch, while Grace White as Maria was equally excellent. Also on the night, Riff was portrayed by Jordan Rickets, Bernardo (Javier Aguilera), Rosalie (Kathryn Irwin), Consuela (Melissa Huband), Action (Caven Rimmer), Snowboy (Charlie Howell) and Anybodys (Jasmine Bailey). The show was produced by Becky Charles with choreography and direction from Pollyanna Tanner, while the music was directed by Chris Newton.

I still dislike the show, but it proves one thing. You can make a silk purse out of a sow’s ear.

West Side Story – New Alexander Theatre, Birmingham – 25 August 2017

Cheers.

Antony N Britt

I went into The Commitments blind. I’ve not seen the film, or read the book, so at least I could evaluate this show on its own merits. And, oh, how disappointed I was. However good the earlier incarnations are supposed to be, The Commitments does not translate well to stage.

The Commitments – The New Alexander Theatre, Birmingham – 15 March 2017

Straight from a lukewarm opener in Proud Mary which totally failed to make an impression, I was treated to a lacklustre Act One in which not a single number grabbed me. There was no flow or rhythm, and not only with the music. Too many characters diluted performances, giving no standout acting. Fast dialogue with little cohesion made the whole thing a mess. I like to be drawn into proceedings, feel as though I’m on stage and part of the wonderful theatre process. Not with The Commitments.

And Act Two was little better. After an hour of a first half which dragged, there were at least a few performances to make me sit up and take note now. But not many. (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction was the first to make me really want to applaud, as was the case with Papa Was a Rolling Stone. These instances, however, were too few during the show.

I think the main issue was the flawed script which production had to work with. The book written by original author, Roddy Doyle, is poor with characters lacking anything which would make me want to warm to them. Basically, I didn’t care about any and even in the case of the unlikable, that’s criminal in writing, to have gained no empathy. Also, little use of choreography meant there weren’t any plus points to be salvaged in that department, either.

Only when we reached the encore/finale did the talents of those on stage have a chance to shine once free from the bindings of the awful script. However, Mustang Sally and best of the night – River Deep, Mountain High were too little, too late. Many of the audience were fed up by then and there was nothing to be salvaged. Even the premier number, Try a Little Tenderness, didn’t live up to expectations. Asked to get to their feet with hands in the air, roughly 30% of the audience obliged, when it should have been everybody.

Playing the part of Deco on this occasion was Ben Morris with Andrew Linnie (Jimmy), and former Coronation Street star, Kevin Kennedy as Jimmy’s Da. It was a shame for Kennedy to have such an underused and irrelevant role, his only purpose seeming to be to shout, “Turn that shite off,” every now and again. I wish they had turned it off.

Supporting were: John Curran (Billy/Dave), Padraig Dooney (Dean), Sam Fordham (Mickah), Christian James (Outspan), Alex McMorran (Joey the Lips), Peter Mooney (Derek), Amy Penston (Natalie), Leah Penston (Imelda), Christina Tedders (Bernie) and Rhys Whitfield (James).

The Commitments was directed and choreographed by Caroline Jay Ranger with musical direction – Alan Williams.

I did feel for the cast, as I’m sure on another day, their talents will shine. But not in The Commitments.

The Commitments – The New Alexander Theatre, Birmingham – 15 March 2017

Cheers.

Nick

This show is personal to me because less than 12 months ago, I performed in Thoroughly Modern Millie with my own local theatre company. So how did the professionals measure up?

Well, the first thing to note was looking at the programme, I saw one of the Chinese duo was being played by someone from Hong Kong. Now having spent six months learning lines in Mandarin, I reckon that was cheating.

I jest. The show was great. Straight from the off we had vibrant energy and good fun.

Thoroughly Modern Millie – New Alexander Theatre – 13 February 2017

Playing the part of Millie Dillmount was Strictly Come Dancing’s, Joanne Clifton. What can I say? Well performed with good vocals and fantastic dance. Nothing, though, that I wouldn’t expect from one who had just partnered the winner in the recent series.

The other billed star was soap actress, Michelle Collins, who played the villainess, Mrs Meers. Now I do actually like Ms Collins, but I wasn’t particularly wowed on this occasion. There was a lack of character and not enough differentiation between the American accent (which wasn’t convincing to start with) and the fake Chinese. It seems a regular downside for me, seeing the big name stars not living up to the hype. She was still good, but not up there with others in the show, particularly Katherine Glover as Miss Dorothy,

There was excellent direction and choreography on the night, but I’d anticipated this when learning Racky Plews was at the helm. This is the third Plews outing for me in a year and all have been of a high standard. Amazing for me, also, was how good a sound was produced by only having a seven-piece band under the direction of Rob Wicks. Overseeing everything was Executive Producer, David King.

Also on stage for the tour are: Sam Barrett (Jimmy Smith), Jenny Fitzpatrick (Muzzy Van Hossmere), Damian Buhagiar (Ching Ho), Andy Yau (Bun Foo), Catherine Mort (Miss Flannery) and Graham MacDuff (Trevor Graydon III). The latter stole a good part of Act Two and it’s amazing how a drunk scene can do this.

It’s hard to pick a stand out number as I am so familiar with all of them. Therefore, I’ll simply say, Gimme Gimme, Speed Test, Forget About the Boy, and all the rest were top quality, too.

Couple of niggles. No Mamma appearance at the end, and Muqin could have been more OTT.

Still, a great night out, and plenty of goosebumps reliving my own experience of last May. So did the pros do it justice? Certainly, in my opinion.

 

Cheers.

 

Nick

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